2017-18 Academic Catalog

Department of Geosciences

Interim Department Head: Dr. John Rodgers
Office: 108 Hilbun
Undergraduate Coordinator: Dr. Andrew Mercer
Academic Coordinator: Tina Davis

B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geoscience  and a PhD in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences are offered with emphasis in sub-disciplines described below. Minors are offered at both B.S. and M.S. levels in Geoscience.

The Department of Geosciences strives for an integrated, interdisciplinary study of the whole Earth from the bachelor's through the Ph.D. levels. Course offerings are grouped into six areas of emphasis:

  1. Professional Geology - physical, biological, and chemical aspects of the Earth;
  2. Geography - distribution of physical features and human interaction with the Earth;
  3. Environmental Geoscience - conservation and management of Earth resources and remediation of natural and human hazards;
  4. Broadcast Meteorology/Climatology - radio/television weathercasting;
  5. Professional Meteorology/Climatology - atmospheric processes and climatic variability; and
  6. Geographic Information Systems - spatial analysis and topological relationships of geographic data.
     

The Geoscience curriculum provides fundamental training for future employment in the petroleum and environmental industries; education; state and federal government agencies; environmental consulting; meteorological/climatological consulting; weathercasting on radio and television; and advanced studies in graduate school.

Within the six areas of emphasis outlined above, a student may further focus interests in a variety of areas including: water resources, hydrogeology and environmental clean-up and monitoring, petroleum exploration and services, construction and urbanization involving geological applications, geophysics and geochemistry, sedimentary geology and paleontology, Quaternary geology and karst processes, Geographic Information Systems, or analysis and prediction of weather and climate. A minimum of 40 credit hours in geoscience courses is required for the geoscience degree. A grade of C or higher is required on all departmental courses to satisfy graduation requirements. Students in the professional geology concentration are required to take the Association of State Board of Geologists Fundamentals of Geology (ASBOG-FG) exam.

A minor in geoscience consists of a minimum of 14 credit hours in courses numbered 2000 and above, in addition to the first year courses. The following are examples of variations within a geoscience minor. A minor with a Geology emphasis should include physical (GG 1113/GG 1111) and historical geology (GG 1123/GG 1121) plus 14 hours 2000 and above for a total of 22 hours; for an Environmental Geoscience emphasis, physical and historical geology with laboratory plus introduction to environmental geology (GG 3133) and other course work 2000 and above for a total of 22 hours; for emphasis in Geography, cultural geography (GR 2013), world geography (GR 1123) and other course work 2000 and above; and Broadcast Meteorology/climatology, physical geography (GR 1114) and either introduction to environmental geology (GG 3133) or conservation of natural resources (GR 3113) and other course work 2000 and above for a total of 21 hours. Minors in Geoscience are also available at the M.S. level.

Three educational enhancement awards and seven scholarships are available to students majoring in Geoscience, namely the F.F. Mellen, Forrest W. Pace, and Summer Geology Educational Enhancement awards, and the George W. Bishop, the Paul H. Dunn Memorial, the Ronald Greeley Memorial, the Gordon W. Gulmon, the Sistrunk Endowed, the Mark Worthey Endowed, and the Geosciences Endowed Scholarships. The three Educational Enhancement Awards provide financial assistance to those enrolled in field geology camp during the summer. The seven scholarships are awarded to students for academic excellence. All are restricted to students at junior or senior rank, with the exception of the Sistrunk Endowed and the Worthey Endowed Scholarships, and the Greeley Memorial and Geosciences Endowed Scholarships, which are for graduate students.

The Department of Geosciences encourages involvement in Sigma Gamma Epsilon, a nationally recognized honorary Earth Science society and Gamma Theta Upsilon, international honor society in geography. Requirements for acceptance in Sigma Gamma Upsilon include a grade-point average of at least 3.00 in 12 or more hours of geoscience and a cumulative average of 2.67. Requirements for Gamma Theta Upsilon are a grade-point average of at least 3.3 overall as well as in at least 9 hours of "GR" courses.

The Department of Geosciences participates with the National Weather Association (NWA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS) in training individuals for the respective “Weathercaster Seals of Approval”. The Office of the State Climatologist and the MSU Climatology Laboratory are housed in the Department and are strongly involved in programs for all students with interests in professional and broadcast meteorology and climatology.

Distance Learning Programs

The Department of Geosciences offers three distance learning programs listed below that can lead to a degree in Geosciences. Each program utilizes recorded lectures and the Internet for course instruction.

Broadcast and Operational Meteorology Program. A three-year, 17 course, 52 credit hour program of study that can lead to a B.S. degree in Geosciences. Primarily for individuals in television weather.

Teachers In Geoscience Program. A two-year, 12 course, 36 credit hour program of study that leads to a M.S. degree in Geosciences. Primarily for K-12 teachers. An additional two-year, 10 course, 30 credit hour program of advance course work is available.

Applied Meteorology Program. A two-year, 12 course 36 credit hour program of study that leads to a M.S. degree in Geosciences. Primarily for individuals with meteorological, environmental, or hazards-related careers.

Environmental Geoscience Program. A 30-credit hour, non-thesis program that leads to a M.S. degree in Geosciences. It is designed for students interested in graduate study of a broad cross-section of the geosciences and is offered both on-campus and through distance education.

Geosciences Major

General Education and College Requirements

English Composition
EN 1103English Composition I3
or EN 1163 Accelerated Composition I
EN 1113English Composition II3
or EN 1173 Accelerated Composition II
Foreign Language
2 semesters - one Foreign Language (see advisor)6
Humanities
Literature - see General Education courses3
History - see General Education courses3
Mathematics
Specified under concentration areas6
Fine Arts
CO 1503Introduction to the Theatre (for Broadcast Meteorology)3
See A&S Core requirements (for other concentrations)
Natural Sciences
Specified under concentration areas9-12
Social Sciences
GR 1123Introduction to World Geography3
CO 1403Introduction to the Mass Media (for Broadcast Meteorology)3
see Gen. Ed./A&S Core (other concentrations)3
Major Core
Basic Courses
GG 1113
GG 1111
Survey of Earth Sciences I
and Earth Sciences I Laboratory
4
or GR 1114 Elements of Physical Geography
Oral Communication Requirement
CO 1003Fundamentals of Public Speaking3

Choose one of the following concentrations:

Professional Geology Concentration (GEOL)

Mathematics
MA 1713Calculus I3
MA 1723Calculus II3
Natural Sciences
CH 1213Chemistry I3
CH 1211Investigations in Chemistry I1
CH 1223Chemistry II3
CH 1221Investigations in Chemistry II1
PH 1113General Physics I3
PH 1123General Physics II3
PH 1133General Physics III3
or GG 4233 Applied Geophysics
Concentration Requirements
GG 1121Earth Sciences II Laboratory1
GG 1123Survey of Earth Sciences II3
GG 3133Introduction to Environmental Geology3
GG 3613Water Resources 13
GG 4114Mineralogy4
GG 4123Petrology3
GG 4201Practicum on Paleontology1
GG 4304Principles of Sedimentary Deposits I4
GG 4413Structural Geology3
GG 4333Geowriting 23
GG 4443Principles of Sedimentary Deposits II3
GG 4503Geomorphology3
GR 2313Maps and Remote Sensing3
GR 4633Statistical Climatology3
or ST 2113 Introduction to Statistics
or ST 3123 Introduction to Statistical Inference
Summer Field Camp 36
Choose one of the following:3
Principles of Paleobiology
Micropaleontology
Choose two of the following:6
Planetary Geology
Introduction to Oceanography
Coastal Environments
Introduction to Meteorology
Choose three of the following:9
Development of Fossil Fuel Resources
Engineering Geology
Subsurface Methods
Physical Hydrogeology
Principles of GIS
3
Total Hours124
1

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement.

2

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement and Writing Requirement.

3

From an approved university. See advisor.

Environmental Geoscience Concentration (ENGS)

Mathematics
MA 1313College Algebra3
MA 1323Trigonometry3
Natural Sciences
Science with lab (CH, PH, BIO)6-8
Science without lab (CH, PH, BIO)3
Concentration Requirements
GG 3603Introduction to Oceanography3
GG 3613Water Resources 13
GG 4333Geowriting 23
GR 1603Introduction to Meteorology3
GR 4633Statistical Climatology 13
or ST 2113 Introduction to Statistics
or ST 3123 Introduction to Statistical Inference
4000 level departmental courses18
Choose one of the following:3
Planetary Geology
Introduction to Environmental Geology
Coastal Environments
Maps and Remote Sensing
Conservation of Natural Resources
Natural Hazards and Processes
General Electives
Consult advisor39
Total Hours124
1

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement.

2

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement and Writing Requirement.

Geography Concentration (GPHY)

Mathematics
MA 1313College Algebra3
MA 1323Trigonometry3
Natural Sciences
Science with lab (CH, PH, BIO)6-9
Science without lab (CH, PH, BIO)3
Concentration Requirements
GG 4333Geowriting 13
GR 1603Introduction to Meteorology3
GR 2013Cultural Geography3
GR 2313Maps and Remote Sensing3
GR 4203Geography of North America3
GR 4303Principles of GIS3
GR 4633Statistical Climatology3
or ST 2113 Introduction to Statistics
or ST 3123 Introduction to Statistical Inference
4000 level departmental courses12
Choose four of the following:12
Introduction to Environmental Geology
Introduction to Oceanography
Water Resources 2
Coastal Environments
Conservation of Natural Resources
Natural Hazards and Processes
Choose four of the following:12
Urban Geography
Geography of Latin America
Geography of Europe
Geography of Asia
Geography of Russia and the Former Soviet Republics
Geography of Africa
Geography of the South
Geography of Islamic World
General Electives
Consult Advisor15-18
Total Hours124
1

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement and Writing Requirement

2

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement.

Broadcast Meteorology Concentration (BMP)

Mathematics
MA 1713Calculus I3
MA 1723Calculus II3
Natural Sciences
CH 1043Survey of Chemistry I3
PH 1113General Physics I (w/ lab)3
PH 1123General Physics II (w/ lab)3
Concentration Requirements
GR 1603Introduction to Meteorology3
GR 4402Weather Analysis I2
GR 4412Weather Analysis II2
GR 4422Weather Forecasting I2
GR 4432Weather Forecasting II2
GR 4613Applied Climatology3
GR 4623Physical Meteorology3
GR 4633Statistical Climatology 13
or ST 3123 Introduction to Statistical Inference
GR 4733Synoptic Meteorology3
GR 4753Satellite and Radar Meteorology3
GR 4813Natural Hazards and Processes3
GR 4823Dynamic Meteorology I3
GR 4933Dynamic Meteorology II3
GR 4963Mesoscale Meteorology3
GR 4502Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology I2
GR 4512Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology II2
GR 4522Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology III2
GR 4532Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology IV2
CO 2013Voice and Articulation3
CO 3313News Writing for the Electronic Media 23
CO 2333Television Production3
CO 3333Advanced Television Production3
Departmental elective 3000- or 4000-level3
Choose two of the following:6
Planetary Geology
Introduction to Environmental Geology
Introduction to Oceanography
Water Resources
Coastal Environments
Conservation of Natural Resources
Geography of North America
General Electives
Consult Advisor8
Total Hours124
1

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement.

2

Fulfills Writing Requirement.

Professional Meteorology Concentration (PMET)

Mathematics
MA 1713Calculus I3
MA 1723Calculus II3
MA 2733Calculus III3
MA 3253Differential Equations I3
Natural Sciences
CH 1213Chemistry I3
CH 1211Investigations in Chemistry I1
PH 2213Physics I3
PH 2223Physics II3
Concentration Requirements
GG 4333Geowriting 23
GR 1603Introduction to Meteorology3
GR 4402Weather Analysis I2
GR 4412Weather Analysis II2
GR 4422Weather Forecasting I2
GR 4432Weather Forecasting II2
GR 4613Applied Climatology3
GR 4623Physical Meteorology3
GR 4633Statistical Climatology 13
or ST 3123 Introduction to Statistical Inference
GR 4733Synoptic Meteorology3
GR 4753Satellite and Radar Meteorology3
GR 4823Dynamic Meteorology I3
GR 4933Dynamic Meteorology II3
GR 4963Mesoscale Meteorology3
Choose two of the following:6-7
Planetary Geology
Introduction to Environmental Geology
Introduction to Oceanography
Water Resources
Geographic Information Systems Programming 1
Coastal Environments
Natural Hazards and Processes
Conservation of Natural Resources
Geography of North America
Computer Science
any 1000-level course
Specified Electives
See advisor20-23
AMS (Broadcast Meteorology)
GR 4502Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology I2
GR 4512Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology II2
GR 4522Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology III2
GR 4532Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology IV2
GG 3613Water Resources3
GR 4813Natural Hazards and Processes3
CO 2333Television Production3
CO 3333Advanced Television Production3
GIS
GR 2313Maps and Remote Sensing3
GR 3303Survey of Geospatial Technologies3
GR 4303Principles of GIS3
GR 4313Advanced GIS3
GR 4323Cartographic Sciences3
GR 4333Remote Sensing of the Physical Environment3
GR 4353Geodatabase Design3
ROTC
AS 1012Foundations of U.S. Air Force-I2
AS 1022Foundations of U.S. Air Force-II2
AS 2012Air and Space Power-I2
AS 2022Air and Space Power-II2
AS 3013Air Force Leadership Studies-I3
AS 3023Air Force Leadership Studies-II3
AS 4013National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty-I3
AS 4023National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty-II3
General Electives
Consult advisor1-4
Total Hours124
1

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement.

2

Fulfills Writing Requirement.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Concentration

Mathematics
MA 1313College Algebra3
MA 1323Trigonometry3
Natural Sciences
Science with lab (CH, PH, BIO)6-9
Science without lab (CH, PH, BIO)3
Concentration Requirements56
GR 1603Introduction to Meteorology3
GR 2313Maps and Remote Sensing3
GR 3303Survey of Geospatial Technologies3
GR 3113Conservation of Natural Resources3
GR 4303Principles of GIS3
GR 4313Advanced GIS3
GR 4323Cartographic Sciences3
GR 4333Remote Sensing of the Physical Environment3
GR 4353Geodatabase Design3
GG 4333Geowriting 23
4000-level departmental courses12
CSE 1284Introduction to Computer Programming4
ST 3123Introduction to Statistical Inference3
or GR 4633 Statistical Climatology
GR 4343Advanced Remote Sensing in Geosciences3
GR 4363Geographic Information Systems Programming3
PSS 4411Remote Sensing Seminar1
Choose two of the following:6
Introduction to Environmental Geology
Introduction to Oceanography
Water Resources 1
Coastal Environments
Natural Hazards and Processes
General Electives
Consult advisor10-13
Total Hours124
1

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement.

2

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement and Writing Requirement.

Broadcast and Operational Meteorology Concentration (Distance Learning only) 

Mathematics
See A&S Core requirements
Natural Sciences
See A&S Core requirements
Concentration Requirements
GR 1603Introduction to Meteorology3
GR 4443Weather Prediction I3
GR 4453Weather Prediction II3
GR 4473Numerical Weather Prediction3
GR 4603Climatology3
GR 4613Applied Climatology3
GR 4623Physical Meteorology3
GR 4633Statistical Climatology3
GR 4713Synoptic Meteorology I3
GR 4753Satellite and Radar Meteorology3
GR 4813Natural Hazards and Processes3
GR 4913Thermodynamic Meteorology3
GR 4923Severe Weather3
GG 3603Introduction to Oceanography3
GG 3613Water Resources 13
GG 4333Geowriting 23
or CO 3313 News Writing for the Electronic Media
General Electives25-27
Total Hours124
1

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement.

2

Fulfills Computer Literacy Requirement and Writing Requirement.

Geography Courses

GR 1001 First Year Seminar: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. First-year seminars explore a diverse array of topices that provide students with an opportunity to learn about a specific discipline from skilled faculty members

GR 1114 Elements of Physical Geography: 4 hours.

Three hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Systematic study of the elements of the environmental process that form and characterize the earth's natural landscapes. May be taken as a science elective

GR 1123 Introduction to World Geography: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A survey of the world's regions, with emphasis upon locational aspects, physical and cultural diversity, and environmental issues

GR 1603 Introduction to Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1114, GR 1113 or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Descriptive study of weather with the objective of gaining appreciation of the variety of atmospheric phenomena. Explanation of daily weather events, their causes and impacts

GR 2013 Cultural Geography: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Study of human occupance of the Earth, treating geographic aspects of population, settlement, origin and diffusion of cultural traits, resource utilizing systems, and political factors

GR 2313 Maps and Remote Sensing: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Fundamental principles of cartography and remote sensing, including types and applications. Attention is given to interpretation of surface features, environmental problem solving, and environmental planning

GR 2990 Special Topics in Geography: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

GR 3113 Conservation of Natural Resources: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Consideration of the current problems associated with the conservation of soils, forests, waters, minerals, and wild life in the United States and the world

GR 3303 Survey of Geospatial Technologies: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 2313 or Consent of Instructor).Three hours lecture. Geographic Information Systems,Remote Sensing and Global Positioning Systems applied to earth systems and science. Includes field excursions for hands on experience with currrent technologies

GR 4000 Directed Individual Study in Geography: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

GR 4123 Urban Geography: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Historic trends in distribution and growth of urban settlements, urban location theory; economic bases, functions, and structure of cities and metropolitan areas; urban problems; planning

GR 4203 Geography of North America: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of the United States and Canada with emphasis upon place names, physical landscapes, historical settlement patterns, cultural regions, and environmental issues

GR 4213 Geography of Latin America: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of Latin America with emphasis upon place names, physical environments, cultural landscapes and their evolution, and environmental issues

GR 4223 Geography of Europe: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of Europe with emphasis upon placements, physical environments, cultural landscapes, geopolitical evolution, and environment issues

GR 4233 Geography of Asia: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of Asia with emphasis upon placenames, physical geography, cultural diversity and cultural landscapes, geopolitical conflicts, and environmental issues

GR 4243 Geography of Russia and the Former Soviet Republics: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of the former Soviet Union republics with emphasis upon placenames, physical environments, ethnic diversity, geopolitical evolution, and environmental issues

GR 4253 Geography of Africa: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of the African continent with emphasis upon placenames, physical geography, cultural diversity and cultural landscapes, geopolitical changes, and environmental issues

GR 4263 Geography of the South: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of the South with emphasis upon physical and cultural landscapes, settlement patterns, ethnic diversity, tourism development, and environmental issues

GR 4283 Geography of Islamic World: 3 hours.

A regional survey of Islamic countries of the world with emphasis upon physical landscapes, cultural landscapes and their evolution, geopolitical conflicts and environmental issues

GR 4303 Principles of GIS: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior or graduate standing or consent of instructor) Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Spatial analysis and topological relationships of geographic data using Geographic Information Systems, with emphasis on GIS theory

GR 4313 Advanced GIS: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4303/6303 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Vector-based file structure and GIS queries using spatial and geodatabases attributes. Descriptive and prescriptive modeling in the raster domain including regression and linear weighted modeling

GR 4323 Cartographic Sciences: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior or graduate standing or consent of instructor.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Principles of cartographic theory and map design. Types of maps, map projections, proportional symbols, use of color, mapping and statistics, interactive maps, and map animation

GR 4333 Remote Sensing of the Physical Environment: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 3303, GR 3311 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Examines remote sensing methods applicable to large-area analyses of watershed-level drainage systems, urban landscape, landscape vegetation metrics, physical landscape structural components and atmospheric features

GR 4343 Advanced Remote Sensing in Geosciences: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Either GR 4333/6333, ECE 4423/6423, or FO 4452/6452 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Geospatial image analysis; Theoretical basis of radiative transfer in atmosphere and water column; Quantitative remote sensing techniques and geospatial product development

GR 4353 Geodatabase Design: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4303/6303 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Examination of Geodatabase structures. Integration of relational databases with Geographic Information Systems. Management of spatial data using geodatabases. Implementation of Geodatabase processes through spatial programming

GR 4363 Geographic Information Systems Programming: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Either GR 4303/6303 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Design and implementation of geoprocessing scripts. Incorporation of modeling languages within geographic information systems (GIS) analysis. Seamless integration of other software programs with GIS software

GR 4402 Weather Analysis I: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 or equivalent). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Introduction to real-time weather information such as Difax charts, satellite and radar imagery, and text data. Emphasis on Nowcasting

GR 4411 Remote Sensing Seminar: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite:Junior Standing). One hour lecture. Lectures by remote sensing experts from industry, academia, and governmental agencies on the next- generation systems, applications, and economic and societal impact of remote sensing. May be repeated for credit up to four credits. (Same as PSS 4411/6411, ECE 4411/6411, FO 4411/6411)

GR 4412 Weather Analysis II: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4402/6402). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Continuation of Weather Analysis I. Advanced analysis of weather data in Nowcasting

GR 4422 Weather Forecasting I: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4412/6412). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Introduction to the process of creating and disseminating weather forecasts. Use of current weather data in creating daily forecsts for the local area

GR 4432 Weather Forecasting II: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4422/6422). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Continuation of Weather Forecasting I. Emphasis placed on disseminating both oral and written forecasts for the local area

GR 4443 Weather Prediction I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 or consent of instrucor). Three hours video and online. Examination of the complexity of weather forecasting. Emphasis on numerical weather prediction, computer models, and mesoscale analysis

GR 4453 Weather Prediction II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4443 or consent of instructor). Three hours video and online. Continuation of GR 4443. Case studies of weather forecasts. Emphasis on special weather events and places

GR 4473 Numerical Weather Prediction: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). This course provides students with an overview of the theory, processes, developments and applications of existing numerical weather prediction platforms

GR 4502 Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology I: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 or equivalent). One hour lecture. Two laboratory. Introduction to developing a weather story with emphasis on producing weather graphics for television, chroma key mechanics, and weathercast communication

GR 4512 Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology II: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4502/6502). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Continuation of Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology I with emphasis on weather graphics production, weathercast performance, image, and communication. Supported by lab practice

GR 4522 Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology III: 2 hours.

Prerequisite: GR 4512/6512. One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Emphasis on advanced weathercasting, including field reporting, severe weather, and building graphics. Students are assigned actual television weather shows, with performance emphasis in the lab

GR 4532 Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology IV: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4522/6522).One hour lecture.Two hours laboratory. Emphasis on the weathercasting job market in television. Students create actual television weather shows, and focus on producing a resume tape during the semester

GR 4553 Computer Methods in Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 or graduate status). Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Overview of computational methods and techniques commonly used in operational meteorology, focusing on scientific visualization and analysis, and numerical weather prediction

GR 4603 Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1114 or GR 1123, or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Study of the elements and controls of weather and climate, distribution and characteristics of climatic regions

GR 4613 Applied Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GR 1603 or equivalent.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Problem solving in today's world in topics such as bioclimatology, agricultural climatology and land use climatology

GR 4623 Physical Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 1603). An investigation of cloud physics/precipitation processes and solar/terrestrial radiation, including atmospheric dynamics, atmospheric electricity, optics, and instrumentation

GR 4633 Statistical Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GR 1603 or GG 1113 or equivalent and MA 1313 or MA 1713).Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. A survey of the types of statistical weather data available. Manipulation of the data on various temporal and spatial scales

GR 4640 Meteorological Internship: 1-6 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Hours and credits to be arranged. Internship with television station, private company or government agency under supervision of instructor

GR 4643 Physical Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 Introduction to Meteorology). Three hours lecture. An investigation of the physical aspects of Earth’s climate, including interactions between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and land surface, and how they are affected by climate variability and change

GR 4713 Synoptic Meteorology I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GR 1603 or equivalent.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Fundamental principles behind weather forecasting. Physical processes in the atmosphere, atmospheric circulation systems, air mass analysis, frontogenesis and frontolysis

GR 4733 Synoptic Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 1603 and MA 1713) Three hour lecture. Principles and derivation of meteorological theory. Emphasis on energy exchanges, atmospheric moisture, physical processes of atmospheric motion, air masses and fronts, and cyclogenesis

GR 4753 Satellite and Radar Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603.) Three hours lecture. Study of the history, the operations, and the applications of satellites and radar in weather analysis. Theory of meteorological measurements in determinations of atmospheric structure

GR 4813 Natural Hazards and Processes: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GR 1114 or equivalent.) Three hours lecture. A survey of natural phenomena in geology, oceanography and astronomy as applied to meteorology. Detailed study of earthquakes, volcanoes, ocean movements, and solar activity

GR 4823 Dynamic Meteorology I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4733/6733) Three hours lecture. In-depth examination of theoretical methods for determining atmospheric stability and the tools necessary to interrogate the vertical profile of the atmosphere

GR 4841 Observations of Severe Local Storms: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). One hour field experience. Real-world practice in forecasting,nowcasting observation, and reporting of severe storms in U.S. Great Plains

GR 4842 Forecasting Severe Local Storms: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.) One hour lecture and two hour lab. This course provides a theoretical overview and practical application of the severe local storms forecasting process

GR 4843 Field Methods of Severe Local Storms: 3 hours.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. One hour field experience. Application of the latest synoptic and mesoscale severe weather forecasting methods concluding with field operations in the U.S. Great Plains

GR 4883 Radar Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4733.) Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Study of the history, the operation, and the application of radar in weather analysis. Theory and application of radar measurements in the determination of meteorological threats

GR 4913 Thermodynamic Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4723/6723 or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Examination of the meteorological stability within the earth's atmosphere. Focus on analysis of the various stability indices related to predicting severe weather

GR 4923 Severe Weather: 3 hours.

(Prerequisities: GR 4913/6913 or equivalent).Three hours lecture. Descriptive study of severe and unusual weather across the earth. Explanation of variations in severe weather in both spatial and temporal scales

GR 4933 Dynamic Meteorology II: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. (Prerequisite GR 4823/6823 and MA 2733) Quantitative analysis and consideration of atmospheric circulation including jet streams, mid-latitude cyclones, vorticity and atmospheric kinetics

GR 4943 Tropical Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Three hours lecture. Topics include the dynamics and circulation of the tropical atmosphere, characteristics of tropical cyclones, and forecasting methodologies for tropical weather

GR 4963 Mesoscale Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4913/6913). Three hours lecture. Descriptive and physical understanding of Mesoscale processes and their relevance to the synoptic environment. A strong focus will be placed upon Severe Local Storms

GR 4990 Special Topics in Geography: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

GR 6113 Meteorology I: Observations: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture(online) Principles of meteorology with emphasis on elements, controls, and forecasting of atmospheric phenomena. Concentration on daily weather observation and the movement of weather systems. Primarily for K-12 teachers

GR 6123 Urban Geography: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Historic trends in distribution and growth of urban settlements, urban location theory; economic bases, functions, and structure of cities and metropolitan areas; urban problems; planning

GR 6203 Geography of North America: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of the United States and Canada with emphasis upon place names, physical landscapes, historical settlement patterns, cultural regions, and environmental issues

GR 6213 Geography of Latin America: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of Latin America with emphasis upon place names, physical environments, cultural landscapes and their evolution, and environmental issues

GR 6223 Geography of Europe: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of Europe with emphasis upon placements, physical environments, cultural landscapes, geopolitical evolution, and environment issues

GR 6233 Geography of Asia: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of Asia with emphasis upon placenames, physical geography, cultural diversity and cultural landscapes, geopolitical conflicts, and environmental issues

GR 6243 Geography of Russia and the Former Soviet Republics: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of the former Soviet Union republics with emphasis upon placenames, physical environments, ethnic diversity, geopolitical evolution, and environmental issues

GR 6253 Geography of Africa: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of the African continent with emphasis upon placenames, physical geography, cultural diversity and cultural landscapes, geopolitical changes, and environmental issues

GR 6263 Geography of the South: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A regional survey of the South with emphasis upon physical and cultural landscapes, settlement patterns, ethnic diversity, tourism development, and environmental issues

GR 6283 Geography of Islamic World: 3 hours.

A regional survey of Islamic countries of the world with emphasis upon physical landscapes, cultural landscapes and their evolution, geopolitical conflicts and environmental issues

GR 6303 Principles of GIS: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior or graduate standing or consent of instructor) Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Spatial analysis and topological relationships of geographic data using Geographic Information Systems, with emphasis on GIS theory

GR 6313 Advanced GIS: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4303/6303 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Vector-based file structure and GIS queries using spatial and geodatabases attributes. Descriptive and prescriptive modeling in the raster domain including regression and linear weighted modeling

GR 6323 Cartographic Sciences: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior or graduate standing or consent of instructor.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Principles of cartographic theory and map design. Types of maps, map projections, proportional symbols, use of color, mapping and statistics, interactive maps, and map animation

GR 6333 Remote Sensing of the Physical Environment: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 3303, GR 3311 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Examines remote sensing methods applicable to large-area analyses of watershed-level drainage systems, urban landscape, landscape vegetation metrics, physical landscape structural components and atmospheric features

GR 6343 Advanced Remote Sensing in Geosciences: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Either GR 4333/6333, ECE 4423/6423, or FO 4452/6452 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Geospatial image analysis; Theoretical basis of radiative transfer in atmosphere and water column; Quantitative remote sensing techniques and geospatial product development

GR 6353 Geodatabase Design: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4303/6303 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Examination of Geodatabase structures. Integration of relational databases with Geographic Information Systems. Management of spatial data using geodatabases. Implementation of Geodatabase processes through spatial programming

GR 6363 Geographic Information Systems Programming: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Either GR 4303/6303 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Design and implementation of geoprocessing scripts. Incorporation of modeling languages within geographic information systems (GIS) analysis. Seamless integration of other software programs with GIS software

GR 6402 Weather Analysis I: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 or equivalent). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Introduction to real-time weather information such as Difax charts, satellite and radar imagery, and text data. Emphasis on Nowcasting

GR 6411 Remote Sensing Seminar: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite:Junior Standing). One hour lecture. Lectures by remote sensing experts from industry, academia, and governmental agencies on the next- generation systems, applications, and economic and societal impact of remote sensing. May be repeated for credit up to four credits. (Same as PSS 4411/6411, ECE 4411/6411, FO 4411/6411)

GR 6412 Weather Analysis II: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4402/6402). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Continuation of Weather Analysis I. Advanced analysis of weather data in Nowcasting

GR 6422 Weather Forecasting I: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4412/6412). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Introduction to the process of creating and disseminating weather forecasts. Use of current weather data in creating daily forecsts for the local area

GR 6432 Weather Forecasting II: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4422/6422). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Continuation of Weather Forecasting I. Emphasis placed on disseminating both oral and written forecasts for the local area

GR 6473 Numerical Weather Prediction: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). This course provides students with an overview of the theory, processes, developments and applications of existing numerical weather prediction platforms

GR 6502 Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology I: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 or equivalent). One hour lecture. Two laboratory. Introduction to developing a weather story with emphasis on producing weather graphics for television, chroma key mechanics, and weathercast communication

GR 6512 Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology II: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4502/6502). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Continuation of Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology I with emphasis on weather graphics production, weathercast performance, image, and communication. Supported by lab practice

GR 6522 Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology III: 2 hours.

Prerequisite: GR 4512/6512. One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Emphasis on advanced weathercasting, including field reporting, severe weather, and building graphics. Students are assigned actual television weather shows, with performance emphasis in the lab

GR 6532 Practicum in Broadcast Meteorology IV: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4522/6522).One hour lecture.Two hours laboratory. Emphasis on the weathercasting job market in television. Students create actual television weather shows, and focus on producing a resume tape during the semester

GR 6553 Computer Methods in Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 or graduate status). Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Overview of computational methods and techniques commonly used in operational meteorology, focusing on scientific visualization and analysis, and numerical weather prediction

GR 6603 Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1114 or GR 1123, or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Study of the elements and controls of weather and climate, distribution and characteristics of climatic regions

GR 6613 Applied Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GR 1603 or equivalent.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Problem solving in today's world in topics such as bioclimatology, agricultural climatology and land use climatology

GR 6623 Physical Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 1603). An investigation of cloud physics/precipitation processes and solar/terrestrial radiation, including atmospheric dynamics, atmospheric electricity, optics, and instrumentation

GR 6633 Statistical Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GR 1603 or GG 1113 or equivalent and MA 1313 or MA 1713).Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. A survey of the types of statistical weather data available. Manipulation of the data on various temporal and spatial scales

GR 6640 Meteorological Internship: 1-6 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Hours and credits to be arranged. Internship with television station, private company or government agency under supervision of instructor

GR 6643 Physical Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603 Introduction to Meteorology). Three hours lecture. An investigation of the physical aspects of Earth’s climate, including interactions between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and land surface, and how they are affected by climate variability and change

GR 6713 Synoptic Meteorology I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GR 1603 or equivalent.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Fundamental principles behind weather forecasting. Physical processes in the atmosphere, atmospheric circulation systems, air mass analysis, frontogenesis and frontolysis

GR 6733 Synoptic Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 1603 and MA 1713) Three hour lecture. Principles and derivation of meteorological theory. Emphasis on energy exchanges, atmospheric moisture, physical processes of atmospheric motion, air masses and fronts, and cyclogenesis

GR 6753 Satellite and Radar Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 1603.) Three hours lecture. Study of the history, the operations, and the applications of satellites and radar in weather analysis. Theory of meteorological measurements in determinations of atmospheric structure

GR 6813 Natural Hazards and Processes: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GR 1114 or equivalent.) Three hours lecture. A survey of natural phenomena in geology, oceanography and astronomy as applied to meteorology. Detailed study of earthquakes, volcanoes, ocean movements, and solar activity

GR 6823 Dynamic Meteorology I: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4733/6733) Three hours lecture. In-depth examination of theoretical methods for determining atmospheric stability and the tools necessary to interrogate the vertical profile of the atmosphere

GR 6841 Observations of Severe Local Storms: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). One hour field experience. Real-world practice in forecasting,nowcasting observation, and reporting of severe storms in U.S. Great Plains

GR 6842 Forecasting Severe Local Storms: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.) One hour lecture and two hour lab. This course provides a theoretical overview and practical application of the severe local storms forecasting process

GR 6843 Field Methods of Severe Local Storms: 3 hours.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. One hour field experience. Application of the latest synoptic and mesoscale severe weather forecasting methods concluding with field operations in the U.S. Great Plains

GR 6883 Radar Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 4733.) Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Study of the history, the operation, and the application of radar in weather analysis. Theory and application of radar measurements in the determination of meteorological threats

GR 6913 Thermodynamic Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4723/6723 or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Examination of the meteorological stability within the earth's atmosphere. Focus on analysis of the various stability indices related to predicting severe weather

GR 6923 Severe Weather: 3 hours.

(Prerequisities: GR 4913/6913 or equivalent).Three hours lecture. Descriptive study of severe and unusual weather across the earth. Explanation of variations in severe weather in both spatial and temporal scales

GR 6933 Dynamic Meteorology II: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. (Prerequisite GR 4823/6823 and MA 2733) Quantitative analysis and consideration of atmospheric circulation including jet streams, mid-latitude cyclones, vorticity and atmospheric kinetics

GR 6943 Tropical Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Three hours lecture. Topics include the dynamics and circulation of the tropical atmosphere, characteristics of tropical cyclones, and forecasting methodologies for tropical weather

GR 6963 Mesoscale Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4913/6913). Three hours lecture. Descriptive and physical understanding of Mesoscale processes and their relevance to the synoptic environment. A strong focus will be placed upon Severe Local Storms

GR 6990 Special Topics in Geography: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

GR 7000 Directed Individual Study in Geography: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

GR 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in Geography: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

GR 8123 Meteorology II: Forecasting and Storms: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 6113 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture, video and online. Continuation of Meteorology I. Emphasis on the forecasting of daily weather events and on severe weather. Primarily for K-12 science teachers

GR 8133 Foundations in Forecasting: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 8123 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture (online). Emphasis on daily weather forecasting at the synoptic and meso scales and introduction and investigation of advanced methods

GR 8143 Advanced Forecasting Techniques: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor), Three hours lecture. Regional and mesoscale forecasting topics and techniques, including coastal meteorology,mountain meteorology, fire weather, aviation meteorology and winter weather

GR 8191 Geoscience Review: 1 hour.

(Prerequisites: 30 hours of GR/GG graduate work and consent of instructor.) One hour seminar. Conduit for interactions with faculty members to assist students in preparing for comprehensive assessment in distance learning degree programs

GR 8303 Advanced Geodatabase Systems: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GR 4353/6353 or Consent of instructor.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Examination of database structures utilized in geospatial information systems. Design and use of geospatial databases through spatial programming in development and implementation of spatial models

GR 8313 Advanced Cultural Geography: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Study and analysis of population distribution, densities, and movements; rural and urban settlement patterns and features; principles of cultural geography

GR 8333 Field Techniques in Remote Sensing: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Either GR 4333/6333, ECE 4423/6423 or FO 4452/6452 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Field spectroscopy or proximal sensing; Experiment design and data collection using in situ sensor; Data analysis, model calibration, and validation to quantify biophysical parameters

GR 8400 Field Methods in Geosciences: 1-3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Hours and credits to be arranged. May be taken twice. Provides field experience in the geosciences through planned and supervised outdoor projects and field trips

GR 8410 Field Methods Seminar: 3-4 hours.

(3-4 hours, credits to be arranged). (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). May be repeated for credit two times. A seminar providing synthesis of multiple Geoscience subtopics held in rotating field experience locations

GR 8453 Quantitative Analysis in Climatology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Three hours lecture. Implementation of quantitative methods in climatology, including modeling, resampling methods and spatial techniques, emphasizing climate analysis software packages and data formats

GR 8542 Geographic Literature: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Major or minor in geography). A reading course with emphasis on library research

GR 8553 Research Methods in Geoscience: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours seminar and forum. Defining research problems, formulating hypotheses, collecting data, using analytical techniques, substantiating conclusions for geoscience topics; written and oral presentations of research projects required

GR 8563 GIS Research Applications: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GR 6333, GR 6313, ST 8114 or equivalent, or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. This course examines the research cycle from proposal to peer-reviewed publication via case studies in GIS with applications for medical epidemiology, wildfire, and emergency management

GR 8573 Research in Applied Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Seminar. Discussion and application of current research in applied meteorology. Individual or small group projects with research presentations

GR 8613 Hydrometeorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Three hours lecture-video and online. Hydrometeorological principles with an emphasis on flood forecasting

GR 8633 Climate Change: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Three hours lecture. In-depth examination of changes in earth’s climate through time. Focus is placed on causes, measurement, implications and complexity of climate change

GR 8813 Advanced Hazards and Disasters: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Three hours lecture. Advanced study of the processes, distribution and impacts of hazards and disasters

GR 8833 Weather and Society: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Three hours lecture. Study of the role of weather in and on society through readings, discussion and research

GR 8843 Advanced Mesoscale Meteorology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: MA 1713 or Consent of Instructor) Three hours seminar. Readings, writings and discussion of topics related to the mesoscale atmospheric environment with a strong focus on severe local storms

GR 8913 Philosophy and Ethics in Geosciences: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Three hours seminar. Writing and discussion of topics related to the history and philosophy of science, professional and academic ethics, and epistemological issues related to the Geosciences

GR 8990 Special Topics in Geography: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

GR 9000 Dissertation Research /Dissertation in Geography: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

Geology Courses

GG 1111 Earth Sciences I Laboratory: 1 hour.

Two hours laboratory. Laboratory for GG 1113, but may be scheduled without GG 1113. Includes study of earth materials, maps, and aerial photographs. Planned primarily as a science elective for the non-geology major

GG 1113 Survey of Earth Sciences I: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Study of the Earth in space, the materials of which the Earth is composed, and the processes affecting change on the Earth. Planned primarily as a science elective for the non-geology major

GG 1121 Earth Sciences II Laboratory: 1 hour.

Two hours laboratory. Laboratory for GG 1123, but may be scheduled without GG 1123. Includes the study of fossils, geologic maps, and geologic cross sections. Planned primarily as a science elective for the non-geology major

GG 1123 Survey of Earth Sciences II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1113, or equivalent). Three hours lecture. Origin and development of the Earth through geologic time. Planned primarily as a science elective for the non-geology major

GG 1133 Planetary Geology: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Process oriented examination of the planets and their satellites with emphasis on the "Earth-like" planets and moons

GG 2990 Special Topics in Geosciences: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

GG 3133 Introduction to Environmental Geology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1113). Three hours lecture. Consideration of those aspects of earth science concerned with problems arising from intensive use of earth by modern society

GG 3603 Introduction to Oceanography: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1113). Three hours lecture. A survey of the basic principles and applications of science to the study of the marine environment

GG 3613 Water Resources: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1113 or equivalent or consent of instructor.) Three hours lecture. Introduction to the location, use, recovery and environmental problems of surface and subsurface waters

GG 4000 Directed Individual Study in Geosciences: 1-6 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing). Hours and credits to be arranged

GG 4033 Resources and the Environment: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Formation and development of natural resources involving the basic evolution, planning, and design of a typical lignite coal mine, including environmental monitoring and reclamation

GG 4063 Development of Fossil Fuel Resources: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Formation, deposition, and extraction of fossil fuel resources. Petroleum and coal will be the main fossil fuels examined

GG 4113 Micropaleontology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1123 or equivalent). Three hours lecture. A study of microscopic fossils. May be taken with GG 4201

GG 4114 Mineralogy: 4 hours.

(Prerequisites: GG 1113 and CH 1223, or equivalents). Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. The physical and chemical properties of minerals; crystallography, origin, distribution, association, uses, and identification of minerals

GG 4123 Petrology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4114, or equivalent). Two hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. The origin, occurrence, and classification of the major rock types

GG 4153 Engineering Geology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1113 or equivalent). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Application of geologic principles to location and construction of engineering structures; engineering properties of geologic materials; engineering application of equipment used by geologists

GG 4201 Practicum on Paleontology: 1 hour.

(Prerequisites: GG 1123 or equivalent). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Laboratory for GG 4203, but may instead be taken with GG 4113 or GG 4133. A practicum in morphology of fossils, biostratigrapgy, and paleoecology

GG 4203 Principles of Paleobiology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GG 1123 or equivalents). Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. An introductory study of topics in paleobiology. May be taken with GG 4201

GG 4233 Applied Geophysics: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A survey of the basic principles and applications of geophysics with major emphasis on petroleum exploration

GG 4304 Principles of Sedimentary Deposits I: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4114/6114 or consent of instructor. Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Treatment of sediment and sedimentary rock. Emphasis on texture, fluid processes, deposition, structure, and diagenesis; stratigraphic analysis; and application to subsurface flow systems

GG 4333 Geowriting: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Prepares students to present geosciences information through research papers and other forms of professional communication. Emphasizes writing for careers or advanced study in the geosciences

GG 4403 Gulf Coast Stratigraphy: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4304 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture or field trips. Systematic study of the stratigraphy of the Gulf Coast; actual field experience substituted for class work,when conditions permit

GG 4413 Structural Geology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GG 4123 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Application of the principles of mechanics to the forces deforming the rocks of the Earth's crust; emphasis on structures in sedimentary rocks

GG 4433 Subsurface Methods: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4443 and GG 4413, or equivalent). One hour lecture. Four hours laboratory. The study of subsurface geologic methods including contouring, sampling study, various types of logging, and the interpretation of subsurface data

GG 4443 Principles of Sedimentary Deposits II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4304). Three hours lecture. Application of principles from GG 4304. Introduces facies associations produced in depositional environments, systems, and systems tracts, tectonics and sedimentation, basin classification, and sequence analysis

GG 4503 Geomorphology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. The origin and characteristics of land forms based on a consideration of geologic processes, stages of development, and geological structure

GG 4523 Coastal Environments: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1113 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An introduction to world coastal environments, with emphasis upon major shoreline-shaping processes, geographical variation in coastal landforms, human impacts, and environmental concerns

GG 4533 Geosciences Study Abroad: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Three hours study abroad. Identification of landforms and geomorphic processes and the field data collection techniques. Emphasis on human-environmental interactions

GG 4613 Physical Hydrogeology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 3613 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Advanced study of the interrelationship of ground water and its geologic environment with emphasis on occurrence, distribution, and movement

GG 4623 Chemical Hydrogeology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: CE 3523, CE 8563, or GG 4613/6613 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Advanced study of groundwater and its environment with emphasis on the chemical interaction of water with porous solids and the transport of chemical constituents

GG 4633 Introduction to Geochemistry: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: CH 1223, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Survey of fundamental geochemical principles and methods. Learning in this course will be achieved by participation in analysis of published or unpublished datasets with further interpretation and application to the natural systems

GG 4990 Special Topics in Geosciences: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

GG 6033 Resources and the Environment: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Formation and development of natural resources involving the basic evolution, planning, and design of a typical lignite coal mine, including environmental monitoring and reclamation

GG 6063 Development of Fossil Fuel Resources: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Formation, deposition, and extraction of fossil fuel resources. Petroleum and coal will be the main fossil fuels examined

GG 6103 Geology I: Processes and Products: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture (video and online). Principles of physical geology with emphasis on earth materials and processes, rock and mineral identification, and landscape development. Primarily for K-12 science teachers

GG 6113 Micropaleontology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1123 or equivalent). Three hours lecture. A study of microscopic fossils. May be taken with GG 4201

GG 6114 Mineralogy: 4 hours.

(Prerequisites: GG 1113 and CH 1223, or equivalents). Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. The physical and chemical properties of minerals; crystallography, origin, distribution, association, uses, and identification of minerals

GG 6123 Petrology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4114, or equivalent). Two hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. The origin, occurrence, and classification of the major rock types

GG 6153 Engineering Geology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1113 or equivalent). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Application of geologic principles to location and construction of engineering structures; engineering properties of geologic materials; engineering application of equipment used by geologists

GG 6201 Practicum in Paleontology: 1 hour.

(Prerequisites: GG 1123 or equivalent). One hour lecture. Two hours laboratory. Laboratory for GG 4203, but may instead be taken with GG 4113 or GG 4133. A practicum in morphology of fossils, biostratigrapgy, and paleoecology

GG 6203 Principles of Paleobiology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GG 1123 or equivalents). Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. An introductory study of topics in paleobiology. May be taken with GG 4201

GG 6233 Applied Geophysics: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A survey of the basic principles and applications of geophysics with major emphasis on petroleum exploration

GG 6304 Principles of Sedimentary Deposits I: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4114/6114 or consent of instructor. Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Treatment of sediment and sedimentary rock. Emphasis on texture, fluid processes, deposition, structure, and diagenesis; stratigraphic analysis; and application to subsurface flow systems

GG 6333 Geowriting: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Prepares students to present geosciences information through research papers and other forms of professional communication. Emphasizes writing for careers or advanced study in the geosciences

GG 6403 Gulf Coast Stratigraphy: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4304 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture or field trips. Systematic study of the stratigraphy of the Gulf Coast; actual field experience substituted for class work,when conditions permit

GG 6413 Structural Geology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: GG 4123 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Application of the principles of mechanics to the forces deforming the rocks of the Earth's crust; emphasis on structures in sedimentary rocks

GG 6433 Subsurface Methods: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4443 and GG 4413, or equivalent). One hour lecture. Four hours laboratory. The study of subsurface geologic methods including contouring, sampling study, various types of logging, and the interpretation of subsurface data

GG 6443 Principles of Sedimentary Deposits II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 4304). Three hours lecture. Application of principles from GG 4304. Introduces facies associations produced in depositional environments, systems, and systems tracts, tectonics and sedimentation, basin classification, and sequence analysis

GG 6503 Geomorphology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. The origin and characteristics of land forms based on a consideration of geologic processes, stages of development, and geological structure

GG 6523 Coastal Environments: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 1113 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An introduction to world coastal environments, with emphasis upon major shoreline-shaping processes, geographical variation in coastal landforms, human impacts, and environmental concerns

GG 6533 Geosciences Study Abroad: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Three hours study abroad. Identification of landforms and geomorphic processes and the field data collection techniques. Emphasis on human-environmental interactions

GG 6613 Physical Hydrogeology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 3613 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Advanced study of the interrelationship of ground water and its geologic environment with emphasis on occurrence, distribution, and movement

GG 6623 Chemical Hydrogeology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: CE 3523, CE 8563, or GG 4613/6613 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Advanced study of groundwater and its environment with emphasis on the chemical interaction of water with porous solids and the transport of chemical constituents

GG 6633 Introduction to Geochemistry: 3 hours.

GG 6990 Special Topics in Geosciences: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

GG 7000 Directed Individual Study in Geosciences: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged. (Prerequisite: Consent of student's advisor and instructor). Same as G.C.R.L. MS-700

GG 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in Geosciences: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

GG 8123 Geology II: Earth, Time and Life: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 6103 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture, video and online. Principles of historical geology with emphasis on geological time, earth history, fossils, evolution, and extinction. Primarily for K-12 science teachers

GG 8133 Rocks and Minerals: 3 hours.

Three hours video and online. Prinicples of mineralogy with an emphasis on rock formation and classification

GG 8203 Ocean Science: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:GG 6103 or consent of instructor ).Three hours video and online. Comprehensive examination of the ocean world, focusing on the topography, physics, chemistry, and circulation of the oceans. Primarily for K-12 science teachers

GG 8233 Environmental Geoscience: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 6103 or consent of instructor). Three hours video and online. Study of current environmental problems associated with the earth science realms; atmosphere, bioshpere, hydroshpere, and lithosphere. Primarily for K-12 science teachers

GG 8313 History of Life: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Consent of instructor). Three hours video and online. Paleontological principles with an emphasis on history of life through geological time

GG 8333 Planetary Science: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 6103 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture, video and online. Examination of mineral matter and geological processes of the moon, the planets, asteroids, comets and meteorites. Primarily for K-12 teachers

GG 8343 Paleontology of Dinosaurs: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture video and online. Application of evolutionary and taxonomic principles to the study of dinosaurs and their paleoenvironments. This course is designed as a distance learning course for in-service teachers who are required to teach earth science topics with little or no background knowledge in this subject

GG 8423 Earthquakes and Volcanoes: 3 hours.

Three hours video and online. A study of plate tectonic boundary interactions with an emphasis on earthquakes and volcanoes

GG 8503 Landforms: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor). Three hours video and online. Geomorphological principles with an emphasis on landforms of North America and their formation

GG 8561 Geoscience Seminar: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: Graduate standing). Review of current geoscience literature; preparation and presentation of formal papers

GG 8572 Geologic Literature: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Major in geology). A reading course with emphasis on library research

GG 8613 Hydrology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: GG 6103 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture, video and online. Investigation of the occurrence, distribution, movement, and chemistry of earth's waters. Emphasis on geological controls of surface and groundwater. Primarily for K-12 science teachers

GG 8713 Regional Geology of Eastern North America: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Major in geology). Three hours lecture. A study of physiography, structure, and stratigraphy of eastern North America

GG 8733 Geology of North America: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:Consent of instructor). Three hours video and online. Plate tectonic evolution of the North American continent with emphasis on both process and stratigraphic development

GG 8743 Basin Analysis: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Advanced geologic basin analysis taught through the application of stratigraphic, structural, geophysical, and sedimentologic techniques and professional tools

GG 8913 Research, Readings, and Techniques in Geosciences: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: consent of instructor). Three hours seminar. Writing and discussion of topics related to the conduct of research in the Geosciences with a focus on faculty research areas

GG 8990 Special Topics in Geosciences: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

GG 9000 Dissertation Research /Dissertation in Geology: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credit to be arranged