2016-17 Academic Catalog

School of Human Sciences

Director: Michael E. Newman
Office: (662) 325-2950

The mission of the School of Human Sciences is to improve the well-being of individuals, families, communities and related businesses and industries through teaching, research and outreach. An integrative approach is carried out in these program areas:

  • Agricultural Education, Leadership, and Communications (AELC)
  • Fashion Design and Merchandising (FDM)
  • Human Development and Family Science (HDFS)

The School of Human Sciences currently has the following accreditations: American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) and National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) in Vocational Home Economics and Agriculture.

The commitment of Human Sciences’ faculty and staff to excellence is evident in teaching, especially considering the growth, demand for the programs offered in the School, and the number of teaching and advising awards received by the faculty. The School of Human Sciences has more Grisham Master Teachers and CALS Excellence in Teaching Awards than any other unit within the Division and College. The School remains committed to this path of excellence, striving to provide students with contemporary programs and outstanding learning opportunities at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The School provides strong curricula and excellent teaching and advising.

The School’s programs are strong components of the land grant institution, which is designed to provide outreach to the community and state. The School’s commitment to this process is evident in several outreach programs, such as its early childhood development work. Human Sciences faculty and graduates work with people in and across a variety of settings, including homes; schools; clinical settings; community agencies and institutions; and business, industry, and government. Graduates are prepared to address the social and economic challenges that face the state and its communities.

BS in Agricultural Education, Leadership, and Communications

Academic Coordinator: Cappe Hallberg
Office: (662) 325-7703

The Agriculture Education, Leadership, and Communications major equips graduates with the ability to inform and engage people about agricultural information and issues. This is achieved through curriculum emphasizing practical knowledge and hands-on experiences in teaching, leadership, and communications, in addition to well-rounded, individualized coursework in agricultural topics. Agricultural Education, Leadership, and Communications (AELC) graduates may become involved in a variety of occupations in agricultural business and industry, education, production, extension, and communications. The major requires 124 semester hours as shown in the catalog description. Students may choose to complete a concentration in Agricultural Education, Agricultural Leadership, or Agricultural Communications. The AELC concentrations are achieved by completing a combination of  60 hours of specified courses and restricted agriculture electives as approved by an AELC advisor. All students must earn at least a C in all AIS courses.

The Agricultural Education concentration prepares individuals seeking careers as an agricultural education teacher. The Agricultural Leadership  concentration develops students' skills for employment with the Extension service or a variety of agricultural industry careers. The Agricultural Communications concentration develops students' abilities to communicate about agricultural and life sciences issues.

Students desiring to receive certification to teach in secondary agricultural education will need to complete certification requirements. The Agricultural Education teacher education program at Mississippi State University is Council for Accreditation of Education Preparation (CAEP) accredited. Students must conform to the policies on teacher education, as explained under “Teacher Licensure” elsewhere in this catalog.

Graduates will have knowledge of

  1. principles of teaching and learning;
  2. principles and theories of leadership;
  3. principles o of human communication; and
  4. basic agricultural sciences.

Graduates will be able to

  1. plan and conduct agricultural education programs in classroom and community settings;
  2. communicate effectively orally and in writing to various audiences;
  3. be proficient in computer applications; and
  4. be readily prepared for employment.

In capstone courses, students produce and present reports that demonstrate the performance learning objectives. In addition to faculty assessment, external assessors from other departments and from typical clientele audiences observe presentations and provide feedback.

Field experience supervisors and co-curricular sponsors, along with student participants, provide feedback about the field experience using a form based on the learning objectives.

Degree Requirements

English Composition
EN 1103English Composition I3
or EN 1163 Accelerated Composition I
EN 1113English Composition II3
or EN 1173 Accelerated Composition II
Mathematics
MA 1313College Algebra3
MA 1323Trigonometry3
or MA /ST 2113 Introduction to Statistics
Science
BIO 1134Biology I4
BIO 1144Biology II3-4
or PSS 1313 Plant Science
Extra Science (if appropriate)
CH 1043Survey of Chemistry I3
or CH 1053 Survey of Chemistry II
or CH 1213 Chemistry I
Humanities
Select from General Education courses6
Fine Arts
Select from General Education courses3
Social Sciences
AEC 2713Introduction to Food and Resource Economics3
or EC 2113 Principles of Macroeconomics
or EC 2123 Principles of Microeconomics
See concentration for second Social/Behavioral Science course.3
Major Core
ADS 1113Animal Science3
ADS 1121Animal Science Laboratory1
AIS 2413Introduction to Agricultural Information Science3
AIS 3203Professional Writing in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences3
AIS 3333Professional Presentations in Agriculture and Life Sciences3
AIS 3803Leadership Development in Agriculture and Life Sciences3
AIS 4203Applications of Computer Technology to Agricultural Information Science and Education3
AIS 4403Development of Youth Programs3
AIS 4424Teaching Methods in Agriculture and Human Sciences4
PSS 3301Soils Laboratory1
PSS 3303Soils3
Oral Communication Requirement
Satisfied by the successful completion of AIS 3333 or AIS 44243-4
Writing Requirement
AIS 3203Professional Writing in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences3
Computer Literacy
AIS 4203Applications of Computer Technology to Agricultural Information Science and Education3

Agricultural Education Concentration

AIS 3013Field Experience in AIS3
AIS 4113Methods of Teaching Agriscience3
AIS 4703Experiential Learning Programs in Agriculture3
AIS 4873Professional Seminar in Agricultural Information Science and Education3
AIS 4886Teaching Internship in Agriculture Information Science and Education6
AIS 4896Teaching Internship in Agriculture Information Science and Education6
EDX 3213Individualizing Instruction for Exceptional Children3
PSY 1013General Psychology3
Restricted Plant Science Elective 1
Restricted Environmental Science Elective 2
Restricted Animal Science Elective 3
Agriculture electives15-16
Free electives6
1

Select one course from PSS 1113, PSS 2343, PSS 2423, PSS 3133, PSS 3923, PSS 4103, PSS 4123, PSS 4133, PSS 4613, FO 2113

2

Select one course from PSS 4333, FO 4513, or ENS 2103.

3

Select one course from ADS 2102, ADS 2122, ADS 3142, ADS 3213, ADS 3223, ADS 3312,ADS 3314, ADS 4113, ADS 4212ADS 4223, ADS 4232ADS 4323ADS 4813PO 3313

Agricultural Leadership Concentration

PHI 1123Introduction to Ethics3
or MGT 3823 Socially Responsible Leadership
PSY 3623Social Psychology3
or PS 3013 Political Leadership
CO 1003Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
or CO 3213 Small Group Communication
or CO 3803 Principles of Public Relations
AIS 3813Team Leadership for Agriculture & Life Sciences3
AIS 4803Contemporary Issues in Agriculture and Life Sciences3
PSY 1013General Psychology3
or PS 1113 American Government
or SO 1003 Introduction to Sociology
Agricultural Leadership Elective
Choose one of the following:
ENS 2103Introduction to Environmental Science3
or PS 2703 Introduction to Public Policy
AIS 3500Internship in Agricultural Information Science3
Professional Electives 118
Ag/Business/Communication Electives 212
Free electives6
Total Hours124
1

18 hours of advisor-approved, 3000-4000 level, focus area electives related to career objective (see advisor for suggested areas)

2

12 hours Agriculture, Business, Management, Marketing, or Communication electives (to include all CALS 1000 level and above - ADS, AEC, AIS, PSS, ABE, WFA, FNH, LA, FO, PO, EPP; and MGT, MKT, CO, BL)

Agricultural Communications Concentration

AIS 3603Internship-Agricultural Communications3
AIS 4223Communications Strategies in Agriculture and Life Sciences3
AIS 4803Contemporary Issues in Agriculture and Life Sciences3
CO 1403Introduction to the Mass Media3
CO 2333Television Production3
CO 2413Introduction to News Writing and Reporting3
CO 3403Photographic Communication3
CO 3713Digital Communication3
CO 3803Principles of Public Relations3
PSY 1013General Psychology3
or PS 1113 American Government
or SO 1003 Introduction to Sociology
Focus Area Electives 124
Free Electives6
Completing a minor in Communications, Political Science, or Art is recommended as a part of your program of study.
Total Hours124
1

 Electives must be advisor-approved, focus area-related to a career objective. (See advisor for suggested areas.)

BS in Agricultural Science (AGS)

Academic Coordinator: Cappe Hallberg
Office: (662) 325-7703

The Agricultural Science degree prepares individuals for a variety of agricultural related careers. Many agricultural businesses and organizations are seeking graduates who have a diversified knowledge of agriculture and life sciences, which includes production agriculture, business, leadership and management. Many graduates become involved in agriculture business and industry, production agriculture operations, international agriculture development or pursue advanced study in areas such as nutrition and agricultural education.

Agricultural Science allows students to develop a high concentration of science and specialized agricultural study. Through the Agricultural Science degree program, a student can pursue a bachelor of science in agriculture and develop specialization areas that will serve his/her individual needs and interests. For the degree requirements, students must complete 124 hours, which includes 18 hours of science and 58 hours of agricultural science. Thirty hours will be agricultural science electives, which must be taken from two different agriculture focus areas within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. (See advisor for suggested focus areas.) The student should select agricultural focus areas that are closely related and complement each other and are related to the career objectives of the student. At least 12 hours in each agricultural focus area must be 3000-4000 level courses. The student will also have 14 hours of agriculture and science electives to complete which should also complement the selected agricultural focus areas. At least three hours must be a natural life science.

Graduates will have knowledge of

  1. the diversified field of agriculture;
  2. basic agricultural sciences;
  3. leadership principles;
  4. the basic principles of production; and
  5. the application of basic science principles to production agriculture and agricultural business management.
     

Graduates will be able to

  1. plan and conduct basic agricultural research;
  2. manage an agricultural enterprise (business or production);
  3. provide leadership in a variety of employment settings; and
  4. communicate effectively orally and in writing to various audiences.
     

In various courses, students produce and present reports that demonstrate the performance learning objectives. In addition to faculty assessment, external assessors from other departments and from typical clientele audiences observe presentations and provide feedback.

Internship supervisors and co-curricular sponsors, along with student participants, provide feedback about the internship using a form based on the learning objectives.

Degree Requirements

English Composition
EN 1103English Composition I3
or EN 1163 Accelerated Composition I
EN 1113English Composition II3
or EN 1173 Accelerated Composition II
Mathematics
MA 1313College Algebra3
Select from General Education courses3
Science
BIO 1134Biology I4
BIO 1144Biology II4
CH 1043Survey of Chemistry I3
or CH 1213 Chemistry I
Humanities
Select from General Education courses6
Fine Arts
Select from General Education courses3
Social Science
AEC 2713Introduction to Food and Resource Economics3
or EC 2113 Principles of Macroeconomics
or EC 2123 Principles of Microeconomics
Select from General Education courses3
Major Core
ABE 1863Engineering Technology in Agriculture3
ADS 1113
ADS 1121
Animal Science
and Animal Science Laboratory
4
AEC 3133Introductory Agribusiness Management3
AIS 3333Professional Presentations in Agriculture and Life Sciences3
AIS 3500Internship in Agricultural Information Science1-6
CH 1051Experimental Chemistry1
CH 1053Survey of Chemistry II3
or CH 1223 Chemistry II
EPP 2213Introduction to Insects3
or EPP 4113 Principles of Plant Pathology
PSS 1313Plant Science3
or BIO 2113 Plant Biology
PSS 3301Soils Laboratory1
PSS 3303Soils3
15 hours from each of two agriculture focus areas 130
Agriculture/science electives 1,214
Free electives6
Oral Communication Requirement
AIS 3333Professional Presentations in Agriculture and Life Sciences3
Writing Requirement
AIS 3203Professional Writing in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences3
Computer Literacy
AIS 4203Applications of Computer Technology to Agricultural Information Science and Education3
Total Hours124
1

See advisor for approved courses.

2

3 hours must be a natural/life science.

BS in Human Development and Family Science (HDFS)

Academic Coordinator: Cappe Hallberg
Office: (662) 325-7703

This degree offers an interdisciplinary lifespan approach to the study of children, youth, and families. It encompasses specialty areas in preschool teaching, childcare, youth studies, family studies, child life, and family and consumer sciences teacher education. Students develop an awareness of trends, issues, and public policy affecting families; analyze factors that influence cognitive, emotional, social, and physical development in the contexts of culture and family. Graduates enter diverse public and private sectors that focus on enabling children, youth, and families to function effectively in today’s complex society.

Specific course work is required to specialize in each area or meet Class A teacher licensure requirements for family and consumer sciences in the state of Mississippi. Specific course work is also required to specialize in child life, preschool education, youth studies, or family studies. A grade of “C” or better is required for all major courses (Human Sciences courses).

Degree Requirements

English (General Education)6
Fine Arts (General Education)3
Natural Sciences (2 labs required from Gen Ed)9-11
Extra Science (if appropriate)
Math (General Education)6
Humanities (General Education)6
Social/Behavioral Sciences (General Education)6
Major Core
Science with Laboratory 16
Science 13
Social/Behavioral Sciences 16
HS 1701Survey of Human Sciences1
HS 3303Consumer Economics3
HS 4333Families, Legislation and Public Policy3
HS 4424Teaching Methods in Agriculture and Human Sciences4
HS 4702Human Sciences Senior Seminar2
HS 4803Parenting3
HS 4853The Family: A Human Ecological Perspective3
Writing Requirement3
Professional Writing in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences
Writing for Thinking
Writing in the Behavioral Sciences
Organizational Communications
1

 Satisfies General Education requirement


Child Development Concentration

The child development concentration explores the growth and development of children (conception until adolescence) within the family system and sociocultural milieu. This coursework prepares students to be become competent early care and education professionals, parent educators, child advocates, and early interventionists within the public, private, and non-profit sectors. Students learn real-world application through lab experiences at the Child Development and Family Studies Center and internships in settings that align with the students’ career goals. Students who intern with a certified teacher have the opportunity to obtain a Mississippi State Department of Education license to teach Pre-K and kindergarten.

HS 1813Individual and Family Development through the Lifespan3
HS 2283Child Health and Nutrition3
HS 2803Prenatal and Infant Development3
HS 2813Child Development3
HS 3803Creativity & Play in Young Children3
HS 3813Lifespan Theory3
HS 3823Methods & Materials for Early Care and Education Programs3
HS 3843Guiding Young Children’s Behavior & Social Development3
HS 4701Internship Placement Seminar1
HS 4760Child Development Internship (12 hours)12
HS 4823Development and Administration of Child Service Programs3
HS 4883Risk, Resilience and Preventive Interventions3
CO 1003Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
or CO 1013 Introduction to Communication
COE 4013Facilitative Skills Development3
EDE 3233Teaching Children's Literature at the Elementary and Middle Levels3
EDX 3213Individualizing Instruction for Exceptional Children3
Computer Literacy Course3
Electives8
Child Development Concentration total hours124


Child Life Concentration

A concentration in Child Life provides the student with an overview of the role of the child life specialist working with children and their families in a health care setting.  The primary emphases of the child life concentration are on student demonstration of knowledge, skills, and abilities required to assume the responsibilities of a child life professional.  This includes involvement in the assessment of patients and families; planning and delivering child life services to patients including medical play, pre-procedural teaching, use of distractions, etc.; and evaluating the effectiveness of the interventions and plan. 

HS 1813Individual and Family Development through the Lifespan3
HS 2283Child Health and Nutrition3
HS 2803Prenatal and Infant Development3
HS 2813Child Development3
HS 3803Creativity & Play in Young Children3
HS 3813Lifespan Theory3
HS 3823Methods & Materials for Early Care and Education Programs3
HS 3843Guiding Young Children’s Behavior & Social Development3
HS 4701Internship Placement Seminar1
HS 4770Child Life Internship12
HS 4823Development and Administration of Child Service Programs3
HS 4832Child Life Clinical2
HS 4833The Hospitalized Child.3
HS 4883Risk, Resilience and Preventive Interventions3
CO 1003Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
or CO 1013 Introduction to Communication
COE 4013Facilitative Skills Development3
EDE 3233Teaching Children's Literature at the Elementary and Middle Levels3
EDX 3213Individualizing Instruction for Exceptional Children3
Computer Literacy Course3
Electives3
Child Life Concentration total hours124


Youth Development Concentration

The Youth Development curriculum prepares students to understand and work effectively with children and adolescents, ages 10-18, in a variety of settings.  The program provides students with a comprehensive view of the needs and developmental characteristics of youths, as well as the challenges facing today’s youths.  Emphasis is placed on understanding how youth development does not occur in isolation but is situated in, and affected by, contexts such as relationships, family, neighborhood/ community, school, culture, the economy, and society.  Youth Development students gain valuable real-world experience through a required field experience course and an internship.  Students are also able to develop specific areas of specialization to fit their career interests by choosing from a generous variety of focus area courses.

HS 1813Individual and Family Development through the Lifespan3
HS 3000Field Experience1-6
HS 3813Lifespan Theory3
HS 4701Internship Placement Seminar1
HS 4780Youth Development Internship12
HS 4873Positive Youth Development3
HS 4883Risk, Resilience and Preventive Interventions3
CO 1003Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
or CO 1013 Introduction to Communication
PSY 4223Drug Use and Abuse3
or SW 4533 Substance Abuse and Addictions in Social Work Services
Computer Literacy Course3
Choose three of the following:9
Development of Youth Programs
Human Sexual Behavior
Individualizing Instruction for Exceptional Children
Facilitative Skills Development
Psychology of Adolescence
Choose 15 hours from the following:15
Human Development in the Context of Leisure and Recreation
Environments for Special Needs
Child Development
Teaching the Disadvantaged Child
Principles of Educational Psychology
Giftedness/Creativity
Psychology and Education of the Mentally Retarded
Cultural and Racial Minorities
Introduction to Social Research
Deviant Behavior
Violence in the United States
Criminological Theory
Juvenile Delinquency
Sociology of Sport
Basketball and Football Officials
Adapted Physical Education
Emergency Health Care
Coaching Football
Coaching Basketball
General Safety Methods
Coaching Softball and Baseball
Principles of Management and Production
Organizational Communications
Introduction to Human Resource Management
Organizational Behavior
Staffing in Organizations
Principles of Marketing
Retailing
Personal Selling
Advertising
Electives5
Youth Development Concentration total hours124

Family Science Concentration

The Family Science program helps students discover, verify, and apply knowledge about the family. Family Science students gain valuable real-world experience through a required field experience course and an internship, and graduates are able to receive provisional certification through the National Council on Family Relations as Certified Family Life Educators, recognizing their competence in a broad range of ten family-related content areas. They are prepared to address societal issues including economics, education, work-family issues, parenting, sexuality, gender, substance abuse, domestic violence, unemployment, debt, and child abuse within the context of the family.  Graduates can work in a variety of governmental, non-profit, religious, and private agencies.

Computer Literacy course3
HS 1813Individual and Family Development through the Lifespan3
HS 2813Child Development3
HS 3000Field Experience1-6
HS 3673Environments for Special Needs3
HS 3813Lifespan Theory3
HS 4313Family Resource Management3
HS 4403Introduction to Gerontology3
HS 4701Internship Placement Seminar1
HS 4790Family Science Internship12
HS 4813Adult Development: The Middle Years3
HS 4843Family Interaction3
HS 4873Positive Youth Development3
HS 4883Risk, Resilience and Preventive Interventions3
CO 1003Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
or CO 1013 Introduction to Communication
COE 4013Facilitative Skills Development3
PSY 3413Human Sexual Behavior3
PSY 4223Drug Use and Abuse3
or SW 4533 Substance Abuse and Addictions in Social Work Services
Electives5
Family Science Concentration total hours124

Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Ed Concentration

The Family and Consumer Sciences teacher education program at Mississippi State University is NCATE accredited. Students must conform to the policies on teacher education, as explained under “Teacher Licensure” elsewhere in this catalog. Following is a list of courses taught in selected Mississippi high schools and vo-tech centers: family dynamics, resource management, nutrition and wellness, family and individual health, personal development, and child development. Family and Consumer Sciences teachers can also teach in high school Occupational Programs (such as food production, childcare, and clothing production). Some additional on-the-job training is required to teach these courses. Completion of a Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Science (Family and Consumer Sciences Education emphasis) degree from the School of Human Sciences at Mississippi State University leads to licensure to teach these courses.

HS 1533Apparel Design I3
HS 2203Science of Food Preparation3
HS 2283Child Health and Nutrition3
HS 2293Individual and Family Nutrition3
HS 2524Textiles for Apparel4
HS 2603Interior Design Fundamentals3
HS 2813Child Development3
HS 3000Field Experience1-6
HS 4313Family Resource Management3
HS 4462Curriculum in Human Sciences2
HS 4886Teaching Internship in Human Sciences6
HS 4896Teaching Internship in Human Sciences6
EDF 3333Social Foundations of Education3
EDF 4243Planning for the Diversity of Learners3
EDX 3213Individualizing Instruction for Exceptional Children3
EPY 3143Human Development and Learning Strategies in Education3
EPY 3253Evaluating Learning3
EDS 3411Practicum in Secondary Education1
EDS 4873Seminar in Managing the Secondary Classroom3
KI 1803Health Trends and Topics3
PSY 3413Human Sexual Behavior3
Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Ed Concentration total hours124

Fashion Design and Merchandising (FDM)

This program is designed to provide students with an understanding of fashion and textile industries, consumer behavior, product development, business principles, and technology applications. Students select a concentration in one of two areas: Merchandising or Design and Product Development. Merchandising combines an overview of the fashion industry, consumer behavior, product development, planning, buying business operations and entrepreneurship. Design and Product Development emphasizes the total design and production process fro inception to finished product and its ultimate sale to the consumer. Specialized labs and industry software provide students with extensive hands-on experience in the latest design, product development, and fashion retailing technology applications.  A grade of “C” or better is required for all major courses (Human Sciences courses).

Degree Requirements

English (General Education)6
Fine Arts (General Education)3
Natural Sciences (2 labs required from Gen Ed)6-8
Extra Science (if appropriate)3
Survey of Chemistry I
Math (General Education)6
College Algebra
Business Statistical Methods I 1
Introduction to Statistics
Humanities (General Education)6
3 hours Foreign Language
3 hours Gen Ed course
Social/Behavioral Sciences (Gen Ed)9
General Psychology 2
Introduction to Sociology
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Major Core Courses
HS 1523Visual Design in Dress3
HS 1533Apparel Design I3
HS 1701Survey of Human Sciences1
HS 2524Textiles for Apparel4
HS 2553Fashion Merchandising3
HS 2573Fashion Portfolio Development3
HS 2593Product Development II3
HS 3553Fashion Retailing3
HS 3563Visual Merchandising3
HS 3573Historic Costume3
HS 3593Merchandising and Promotion Strategies3
HS 4701Internship Placement Seminar1
HS 4702Human Sciences Senior Seminar2
HS 4711ATM Senior Portfolio1
HS 4763Apparel, Textiles and Merchandising Internship (6 hours) 33
Oral Communication Requirement
HS 4424Teaching Methods in Agriculture and Human Sciences4
Writing Requirement
HS 4513Social-Psychological Aspects of Clothing3
Computer Literacy
HS 2123Product Development I3
1

See advisor for list of approved courses.

2

 SO 1003 is required for the Sociology emphasis

3

 Two 3-credit hour internships are required.


Merchandising Concentration

The merchandising concentration explores the business and product development aspects of the apparel industry from finalized design to the end-use by consumers and beyond. This coursework prepares students to be become competent in pursuing careers in merchandising, buying, fashion forecasting, fashion communications, fashion business and retail operations. Students learn real-world application through lab experiences and internships in settings that align with the students’ career goals. Students must complete two internships in a related position.
 

HS 4533Merchandise Planning and Buying3
HS 4603Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry3
Select one of the emphasis areas below:
General Merchandising
Choose 18 hours from any of the courses offered in the emphasis areas below.18
Electives7
Business Administration (Pre-MBA)
Choose any 5 of the following:
ACC 2013Principles of Financial Accounting3
ACC 2023Principles of Managerial Accounting3
BIS 3233Management Information Systems3
BL 2413The Legal Environment of Business3
BQA 2113Business Statistical Methods I3
BQA 3123Business Statistical Methods II3
FIN 3123Financial Management 13
MGT 3114Principles of Management and Production 14
MKT 3013Principles of Marketing3
Electives9-10
Communication Studies
CO 1223Introduction to Communication Theory3
CO 2253Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication3
CO 3833Interviewing in Communication3
CO 4203Nonverbal Communication3
CO 4223Advanced Communication Theory3
CO 4243Rhetorical Theory3
Electives7
Entrepreneurship
MGT 3323Entrepreneurship3
MGT 3333Field Studies in Entrepreneurship3
BL 4243Legal Aspects of Entrepreneurship3
FIN 4323Entrepreneurial Finance3
MKT 4423Strategic Brand Management3
GE 3011Engineering Entrepreneurship Seminar1
Electives9
Finance
FIN 3113Financial Systems3
FIN 3123Financial Management3
FIN 3723Financial Markets and Institutions3
FIN 4223Intermediate Financial Management3
FIN 4423Investments3
FIN 4923International Financial Management3
Electives7
Information Technology Services
Choose any 6 of the following courses:
TKB 3133Administrative Management and Procedures3
TKB 4283Advanced Office Systems3
TKB 4543Information Processing3
TKB 4563Introduction to Data Networks3
TKB 4583Graphics and Web Design3
TKT 3463Computer Repair and Maintenance3
TKT 4343Information Technology Project Management3
TKT 4743Elements of Electronic Desktop Publishing3
TKT 4753Media for Presentations, Instruction and Gaming3
TKT 4813Introduction to Instructional Systems3
Electives7
Management
MGT 3813Organizational Behavior3
MGT 3114Principles of Management and Production4
MGT 3513Introduction to Human Resource Management3
Choose any 3 of the following courses:
MGT 3323Entrepreneurship3
MGT 3333Field Studies in Entrepreneurship3
MGT 3823Socially Responsible Leadership3
MGT 4153Management Seminar3
MGT 4533Advanced Human Resource Management3
MGT 4543Compensation Management3
MGT 4563Staffing in Organizations3
MGT 4613Cross-Cultural Management3
Electives7
Sociology
SO 2203Cultural and Racial Minorities3
SO 3213Introduction to Social Research3
Choose any 3 SO designated courses at the 2000 level or above and include at least one 4000 level SO course.
Electives10
1

 Required for Pre-MBA emphasis (B or higher in MBA prerequisite courses)


Design and Product Development Concentration

The Design and Product Development concentration explores the creative and product development aspects of the apparel industry from trend innovation and concept to an end-use product and beyond. This coursework prepares students to be become competent in pursuing careers in creative design, technical design, visual merchandising, styling, fashion communications, fashion forecasting, and related creative industries. Students learn real-world application through lab experiences and internships in settings that align with the students’ career goals. Students must complete two internships in a related position.
 

HS 4343Apparel Design II3
HS 4593Creative Design Techniques3
HS 4733Computer-Aided Design for Human Sciences3
Select one of the emphasis areas below:
General Design and Product Development
Choose 18 hours from any of the courses offered in the emphasis areas below18
Electives4
Art
Choose 18 credit hours of courses with an ART prefix. One or more 1000-level courses and one 2000-level course must be completed in addition to at least three 3000- or 4000-level courses18
Electives4
Business Administration (Pre-MBA)
Choose any 5 of the following:
ACC 2013Principles of Financial Accounting 13
ACC 2023Principles of Managerial Accounting3
BIS 3233Management Information Systems3
BL 2413The Legal Environment of Business3
BQA 2113Business Statistical Methods I 13
BQA 3123Business Statistical Methods II 13
FIN 3123Financial Management3
MGT 3114Principles of Management and Production 14
MKT 3013Principles of Marketing3
Electives6-7
Communication Studies
CO 1223Introduction to Communication Theory3
CO 2253Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication3
CO 3833Interviewing in Communication3
CO 4203Nonverbal Communication3
CO 4223Advanced Communication Theory3
CO 4243Rhetorical Theory3
Electives4
Entrepreneurship
MGT 3323Entrepreneurship3
MGT 3333Field Studies in Entrepreneurship3
BL 4243Legal Aspects of Entrepreneurship3
FIN 4323Entrepreneurial Finance3
MKT 4423Strategic Brand Management3
GE 3011Engineering Entrepreneurship Seminar1
Electives6
Finance
FIN 3113Financial Systems3
FIN 3123Financial Management3
FIN 3723Financial Markets and Institutions3
FIN 4223Intermediate Financial Management3
FIN 4423Investments3
FIN 4923International Financial Management3
Electives4
Information Technology Services
Choose any 6 of the following courses:
TKB 3133Administrative Management and Procedures3
TKB 4283Advanced Office Systems3
TKB 4543Information Processing3
TKB 4563Introduction to Data Networks3
TKB 4583Graphics and Web Design3
TKT 3463Computer Repair and Maintenance3
TKT 4343Information Technology Project Management3
TKT 4743Elements of Electronic Desktop Publishing3
TKT 4753Media for Presentations, Instruction and Gaming3
TKT 4813Introduction to Instructional Systems3
Electives4
Management
MGT 3813Organizational Behavior3
MGT 3114Principles of Management and Production4
MGT 3513Introduction to Human Resource Management3
Choose any 3 of the following courses:
MGT 3323Entrepreneurship3
MGT 3333Field Studies in Entrepreneurship3
MGT 3823Socially Responsible Leadership3
MGT 4153Management Seminar3
MGT 4533Advanced Human Resource Management3
MGT 4543Compensation Management3
MGT 4563Staffing in Organizations3
MGT 4613Cross-Cultural Management3
Electives3
Marketing
MKT 3013Principles of Marketing3
MKT 4413Consumer Behavior3
Choose any 4 of the following courses:
MKT 3213Retailing3
MKT 3323International Logistics3
MKT 3933International Marketing3
MKT 4033International Transportation3
MKT 4113Personal Selling3
MKT 4123Advertising3
MKT 4143Sales Management3
MKT 4213Internet Marketing3
MKT 4313Physical Distribution Management3
MKT 4333International Supply Chain Management3
MKT 4533Marketing Research3
MKT 4613Services Marketing3
Electives4
Sociology
SO 2203Cultural and Racial Minorities3
SO 3213Introduction to Social Research3
Choose any 3 SO designated courses at the 2000 level or above and include at least one 4000 level SO course.
Electives4
1

 Required for Pre-MBA emphasis (B or higher in MBA prerequisite courses)

Agricultural Information Science (AIS) Minor

The Agricultural Information Science (AIS) minor is offered to allow students in other majors to develop leadership and human relation skills needed by new graduates entering the agriculture workforce. Students will enhance their communication, leadership, problem-solving, and interpersonal skills to become effective employees in the agricultural workforce.  Students must complete a minimum of 16 hours of AIS coursework from a list of approved courses. 

Required courses10
Introduction to Agricultural Information Science
Leadership Development in Agriculture and Life Sciences
Teaching Methods in Agriculture and Human Sciences
Electives (choose two of the following)6
Professional Presentations in Agriculture and Life Sciences
Principles and Practices of Extension Education
Development of Youth Programs
International Agricultural Education
Total Hours16

Gerontology Minor/Certificate

Graduate Certificate Coordinator: Associate Professor Joe Wilmoth

Undergraduate Minor Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Adams-Price

The Gerontology Minor/Certificate provides students with current factual and theoretical data along with practical experience relating to the process of aging. It is a multidisciplinary effort with contributions from a variety of departments cutting across several colleges. Students completing the requirements will earn a minor/certificate in gerontology.

This area of study is open to students from all colleges within the University. The Gerontology Minor/Certificate was developed to supplement the student’s chosen major. Undergraduate students wishing to complete the Gerontology requirements will select a major in addition to electing 15 hours of gerontology course work.

Undergraduate Minor Requirements: (minimum 15 hours)

HS 4403Introduction to Gerontology3
Choose at least three of the following:
Issues in Aging
Aging and Physical Activity
Aging and Disability
Adult Development: The Middle Years
Consumer Aspects of Aging
Psychology of Aging
Aging and Retirement in American Society
Sociology of Death and Dying
Human Behavior and the social Environment II
Social Work with the Aged
Choose one of the following (may include courses from above):
Environments for Special Needs
Families, Legislation and Public Policy
Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle
Health and Society
Social Welfare Policy II
DIS or Practicum in Aging

Graduate Certificate Requirements (minimum 13 hours)

HS 6403Introduction to Gerontology3
Choose at least three of the following:
Psychology of Aging
Aging and Retirement in American Society
Sociology of Death and Dying
Consumer Aspects of Aging
Adult Development: The Middle Years
Counseling Elderly Clients
Issues in Aging

Agricultural Info Sci & Ed Courses

AIS 1001 First Year Seminar: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. First-year seminars explore a diverse arrary of topics that provide students with an opportunity to learn about a specific discipline from skilled faculty members

AIS 2103 Seminar in International Studies in Agricultural Systems: 3 hours.

Introduction to world agriculture, farming systems and technologies, crops, trade, and food production and processing. Influence of population and climate on global agriculture. Ethical issues surrounding environment, social, political and financial aspects of agriculture. (Same as GA 2103)

AIS 2413 Introduction to Agricultural Information Science: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. History and principles of agricultural education programs;program development, management, and community involvement;career opportunities in agricultural education

AIS 2613 Introduction to Information and Decision Science in Agroecosystems: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introductory course to the science of helping people learn how to access, analyze, apply and amend information to solve problems in agriculture

AIS 2990 Special Topics in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

AIS 3013 Field Experience in AIS: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor). Supervised field experience for agricultural information science students in approved settings; pre-internship experiential learning opportunity. (May be repeated one time)

AIS 3203 Professional Writing in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Basic principles of and techniques in communicating information relevant to agriculture/agri- business, natural resources., and home economics. (Prerequisite: Completion of EN 1103 and 1113 or equivalent and Junior Standing). Three hours lecture. Basic principles of and techniques in communicating information relevant to agriculture/agribusiness, natural resources and human sciences

AIS 3333 Professional Presentations in Agriculture and Life Sciences: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Strategies and techniques for effective presentations in agriculture, life sciences and natural resourses. Emphasis on oral and visual techniques for formal and non-formal situations

AIS 3500 Internship in Agricultural Information Science: 1-6 hours.

(Hours and credit to be arranged and shall not exceed a total of six hours). Supervised field experiences shall center around experiences related to participation in professional activities relating to problems, methods, and skills basic to agricultural and extension education

AIS 3603 Internship-Agricultural Communications: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: junior standing). Supervised field experiences related to participation in professional activities relating to problems, methods, and basic communications skills in agriculture and life sciences. Course is not repeatable

AIS 3803 Leadership Development in Agriculture and Life Sciences: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Foundational theories and principles of leadership emphasizing personal characteristics, leadership styles, power and influence, group dynamics, and managing change for effective leadership in agriculture

AIS 3813 Team Leadership for Agriculture & Life Sciences: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Strategies and techniques for building and leading a successful team. Self-assessment, team-building skills, and experiential activities in teamwork are emphasized and contextualized specifically in agriculture and life sciences

AIS 4000 Directed Individual Study in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credit to be arranged

AIS 4103 Principles and Practices of Extension Education: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing). Three hours lecture. Comprehensive overview of Cooperative Extension System. Three classroom/contact hours per week. Objectives/procedures to develop, implement and evaluate Extension educational programs; comprehension and application of non-formal and experiential teaching methods for youth and adult audiences

AIS 4113 Methods of Teaching Agriscience: 3 hours.

Prerequisite: AIS 4203/6203 or consent of instructor. Two hours lecture. Four hours laboratory. Objectives, materials, and teaching methods for planning, organizing, and managing agricultural science programs

AIS 4203 Applications of Computer Technology to Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Prerequisite: CS 1013 or BIS 3713 or equivalent). Two-hours lecture and two-hours laboratory. Application of micro- computer technology in agricultural and extension education; data storage and retrieval; and use of canned computer programs in agricultural and educational settings

AIS 4223 Communications Strategies in Agriculture and Life Sciences: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor) Three hours lecture. Evaluation and development of communications strategies for agriculture and life science organizations, issues, and/or products. Integrating communications techniques and teamwork are emphasized

AIS 4403 Development of Youth Programs: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Needs and interests of youth; developing, managing, and evaluating formal and non-formal youth education programs; volunteer and paraprofessional staff development; securing and developing supportive services

AIS 4424 Teaching Methods in Agriculture and Human Sciences: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite: College of Ag and Life Science major and junior standing). Three hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Planning instruction; selection teaching techniques; developing teaching plans; teaching agricultural/human science topics; using instructional technologies; and evaluating learner progress. (Same as HS 4424/6424)

AIS 4503 International Agricultural Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Examination of formal and non-formal agricultural education and related processes that influence global agricultural development including impacts of culture and changing demographics. Analysis of current global agricultural issues, roles of international organizations, and effectiveness of technology transfer

AIS 4703 Experiential Learning Programs in Agriculture: 3 hours.

Theory and practice in planning experiential learning projects for you in agriculture; roles and responsibilities of teachers and extension agents in supervising and evaluating programs

AIS 4710 Study Tour: 1-3 hours.

Experiential learning through travel in the United States or abroad focusing on specialized areas of study in Agricultural Education

AIS 4803 Contemporary Issues in Agriculture and Life Sciences: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Course designed to immerse students in investigation of the issues the agriculture industry faces. Students will uncover the historical aspect of current policy and legislation, identify pertinent contemporary issues, and analyze and describe problems, impacts and solutions

AIS 4873 Professional Seminar in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and senior standing). Three hours lecture. Legal, professional, administrative and curricular issues in agricultural and extension education. Includes needs assessment, community involvement and problem solving to plan formal and informal programs

AIS 4886 Teaching Internship in Agriculture Information Science and Education: 6 hours.

Must be taken concurrently with AIS 4896. (Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and senior standing). Supervised observation and directed teaching in respective field of endorsement

AIS 4896 Teaching Internship in Agriculture Information Science and Education: 6 hours.

Must be taken concurrently with AIS 4886. (Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and senior standing). Supervised observation and directed teaching in respective field of endorsement

AIS 4990 Special Topics in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

AIS 6103 Principles and Practices of Extension Education: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing). Three hours lecture. Comprehensive overview of Cooperative Extension System. Three classroom/contact hours per week. Objectives/procedures to develop, implement and evaluate Extension educational programs; comprehension and application of non-formal and experiential teaching methods for youth and adult audiences

AIS 6113 Methods of Teaching Agriscience: 3 hours.

Prerequisite: AIS 4203/6203 or consent of instructor. Two hours lecture. Four hours laboratory. Objectives, materials, and teaching methods for planning, organizing, and managing agricultural science programs

AIS 6203 Applications of Information Technologies in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Prerequisite: CS 1013 or BIS 3713 or equivalent). Two-hours lecture and two-hours laboratory. Application of micro- computer technology in agricultural and extension education; data storage and retrieval; and use of canned computer programs in agricultural and educational settings

AIS 6403 Development of Youth Programs: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Needs and interests of youth; developing, managing, and evaluating formal and non-formal youth education programs; volunteer and paraprofessional staff development; securing and developing supportive services

AIS 6503 International Agricultural Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Examination of formal and non-formal agricultural education and related processes that influence global agricultural development including impacts of culture and changing demographics. Analysis of current global agricultural issues, roles of international organizations, and effectiveness of technology transfer

AIS 6703 Experiential Learning Programs in Agriculture: 3 hours.

Theory and practice in planning experiential learning projects for you in agriculture; roles and responsibilities of teachers and extension agents in supervising and evaluating programs

AIS 6710 Study Tour: 1-3 hours.

Experiential learning through travel in the United States or abroad focusing on specialized areas of study in Agricultural Education

AIS 6990 Special Topics in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

AIS 7000 Directed Individual Study in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

AIS 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

AIS 8100 Creative Component Project in AEE: 1-6 hours.

Capstone experience supervised by student’s major professor and master’s committee. Individual project involving application of coursework to the student’s career goal. (Hours and credits to be arranged)

AIS 8203 Advanced Communication in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. (1 1/2 hours each). Updating of priciples of communicating information in the fields of agriculture/ agribusiness, natural resources, and home economics; review and updating of communications techniques

AIS 8243 Administration and Supervision in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Principles in developing and administering programs in agricultural and extension education with attention to federal-state-local relationships and surpervisory procedures

AIS 8263 Public Relations in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Publics to be dealt with, public relations media; methods and techniques of establishing and maintaining desirable public relations

AIS 8403 Directing Learning Experience in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Theory and practice in directing learning activities. Using instructional technology. Delivering instruction for formal and non-formal groups

AIS 8413 Methods of Planned Change in Agricultural and Extension Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture.A study of the theories and processes used by change agents to plan, influence and accomplish change in social, educational and corporate environments

AIS 8503 Program Planning and Development in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Principles, theory, and practice in developing local and state programs of vocational, technical, and extension education

AIS 8513 Volunteer Development in Agricultural and Extension Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Principles, theory and practice of volunteer development in extension education, high schools, communities, and/or non-profit organizations

AIS 8523 Teaching Out-of-School Groups in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Orginizing, planning, and instructing out-of-school groups in agricultural and extension education; identifying and assessing needs of clientele; and evaluating effectiveness

AIS 8593 Historical Foundations of Agriculture and Human Science: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Historical development of agricultural education/human sciences program; implications, influences, and evaluation of polices impacting the future of agricultural education and human sciences

AIS 8603 Teaching Internship in AEE I.: 3 hours.

(Co-requisite: AIS 8613). Professional full-day public school teaching experience in diverse settings and grade levels for 8 weeks (320 hours) under classroom mentor teachers and university supervisors

AIS 8606 Teaching Internship in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 6 hours.

(Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate certification pro- gram, teacher education and student teaching). Supervised observation and directed teaching in Agricultural Infor- mation Science and Education

AIS 8613 Teaching Internship in AEEII: 3 hours.

(Co-requisite: AIS 8603). Professional full-day public school experience in diverse settings and grade levels for 8 weeks (320 hours) under classroom mentor teachers and university supervisors

AIS 8693 Philosophical Foundations of Agriculture and Extension Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Philosophies, foundational theories, and research on teaching and learning process applied to formal and non-formal programs in agricultural and extension education

AIS 8703 Evaluation of Agricultural Information Science and Education Programs: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Evaluation principles and procedures used in developing and analyzing vocational, technical, and extension education programs

AIS 8801 Graduate Professional Seminar in AIS: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. Preparing research adn programs for publication and dissemination and participating as a professional in the publication process

AIS 8803 Applying Research Methods to Agricultural Information Science and Education: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Principles and techniques for planning, conducting, and reporting research; development of effective design of research problems; emphasis on understanding and evaluating scientific reports

AIS 8990 Special Topics in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

AIS 9000 Dissertation Research/ Dissertation in Agricultural Information Science and Education: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

AIS 9583 Analysis and Interpretation of Data in Ag and Extension Education Research: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: permission of instructor). Three hours lecture. Principles and techniques for collecting, analyzing, and reporting research in agricultural and extension education. Emphasis on student research project development, student authorship

Human Sciences Courses

HS 1001 First Year Seminar: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. First-year seminars explore a diverse arrary of topics that provide students with an opportunity to learn about a specific discipline from skilled faculty members

HS 1523 Visual Design in Dress: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Application of basic art principles to selection and design of clothing; physical, cultural, social, aesthetic, and psychological aspects of dress

HS 1533 Apparel Design I: 3 hours.

One hour lecture. Four hours laboratory. Principles of clothing construction; problems involving fabric selection, use of commercial patterns, basic fitting

HS 1701 Survey of Human Sciences: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. Introduction to the field of Human Sciences through a study of its history and the variety of professional careers available

HS 1711 Professional Protocol: 1 hour.

One hour lecture. The essentials of professional protocol and accepted standards of social usage

HS 1813 Individual and Family Development through the Lifespan: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introduction to individual and family development through the lifespan, conception to death, focusing on social and emotional development, contextual influences on development, and application

HS 2123 Product Development I: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Introduction to the product development lifecycle in relation to the apparel industry. Emphasis is placed on technology applications at various stages of product development

HS 2203 Science of Food Preparation: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in CH 1213/1221 or HS major). One hour lecture. Four hours laboratory. A study of foods and the principles underlying handling and preparation of food product to maintain the highest standards of quality. (Same as FNH 2203)

HS 2283 Child Health and Nutrition: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Nutrition requirements during pregnancy and lactation, and of infants and young children; birth defects from metabolic errors; related health of young children. (Same as FNH 2283)

HS 2293 Individual and Family Nutrition: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Fundamental principles of human nutrition and the practical application of this knowledge in the selection of adequate diets. (Same as FNH 2293)

HS 2524 Textiles for Apparel: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite:CH 1043 ) Three hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Basic and intermediate study of fibers, yarns, fabic structure, dyes, color application and finishes. Factors influencing selection, appearance, and care/serviceability. Testing textiles for apparel

HS 2553 Fashion Merchandising: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. A survey of the entire fashion industry as it relates to fashion merchandising

HS 2573 Fashion Portfolio Development: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 1523 or equivalent or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Creation of printed and electronic portfolios and related materials for fashion-related careers. Includes project selection; layout and graphics; photography; photo-editing; writing; use of appropriate software

HS 2593 Product Development II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 1523, HS 1533 and HS 2123) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Analysis of product development and manufacturing related to the apparel industry including terminology, design processes, product development, sewn product analysis and quality control

HS 2603 Interior Design Fundamentals: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Introduce a practical approach to the application of interior design in the built environment. (For non interior design students). (Same as ID 2603)

HS 2664 Textiles for Interiors: 4 hours.

(Prerequisite CH 1043 ).Three hours lecture. Two hour laboratory. Study of fibers, yarns, fabric structures,dyes, and finishes related to the textile industry. Emphasis on testing and evaluation of interior textiles

HS 2803 Prenatal and Infant Development: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Biological and environmental influences; behavioral and developmental patterns, from the onset of pregnancy to toddlerhood

HS 2813 Child Development: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 1813 or consent of instructor).Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Developmental characteristics of children with emphasis on the early years; implications for care and guidance

HS 2990 Special Topics in Human Sciences: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

HS 3000 Field Experience: 1-6 hours.

(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor).1-6 hours. Supervised field experience for Human Sciences students in approved settings; pre-internship learning experience

HS 3303 Consumer Economics: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:MA 1313 ) Three hours lecture. Economic principles as they apply to consumer situations, and the consumer's relation to the American and world economy

HS 3553 Fashion Retailing: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites:HS 2553 and ST 2113 or MA 2113 or BQA 2113 or consent of instructor ).Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Specific problems, procedures and practices in fashion retailing

HS 3563 Visual Merchandising: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 2593 and HS 3593). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Principles of window and interior display, individual and group participation in designing and executing displays for commercial and educational purposes

HS 3573 Historic Costume: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 2593 and HS 3593). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Survey of costume from prehistoric to modern times with emphasis on social, cultural, political, and technological changes impacting fashion, preservation, documentation, and exhibition of artifacts

HS 3593 Merchandising and Promotion Strategies: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 2553 and junior standing or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. A study of fashion presentation techniques and production requirements in the primary, secondary and retail settings

HS 3673 Environments for Special Needs: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Laws, attitudes, conditions, specifications, and environmental issues affecting private and public spaces. (Same ID 3673)

HS 3803 Creativity & Play in Young Children: 3 hours.

Prerequisite: HS 2813. Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Selection of appropriate equipment, materials, and activities; program planning for birth to age 5; observation and participation at the Child Development and Family Studies Center

HS 3813 Lifespan Theory: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites:HS 2813 or HS 1813). Three hours lecture. An intensified exploration of human development theory, research and methodology used in the study of individuals across the lifespan.

HS 3823 Methods & Materials for Early Care and Education Programs: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 2813, HS 3803 and junior standing.) Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Designing curriculum and programming for children birth to 5 years of age with emphasis on children’s developmental characteristics as related to appropriate learning experiences

HS 3833 Human Development in the Context of Leisure and Recreation: 3 hours.

(Prereqiusite:HS 1813). Three hours lecture. Introduces historical, theoretical, and empirical content focused on leisure and recreation as a context for human development across the lifespan

HS 3843 Guiding Young Children’s Behavior & Social Development: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 2803 and HS 2813). Three hours lecture. Examine and design appropriate guidance techniques based on developmental growth patterns and individual differences in young children from birth to 5 years old

HS 4000 Directed Individual Study in Human Sciences: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

HS 4313 Family Resource Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior/senior writing or consent of instructor.) Three hours lecture. Decision-making in the family and operation of the household as affected by family values, philosophies, resources, and socio-economic conditions

HS 4323 Consumer Issues and Policy: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 3303 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An assessment of policies and programs relating to information, product safety, and channels of appeal for the individual

HS 4333 Families, Legislation and Public Policy: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior/senior writing or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An examination of the impact of legislation and public policy on the well being of the family with emphasis on policy and family change

HS 4343 Apparel Design II: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS1533 or consent). One hour lecture. Four hours laboratory. Advanced problems and techniques for clothing construction; creative expression through application of techniques of flat pattern design

HS 4403 Introduction to Gerontology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 1813 and junior/senior writing, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An introduction to the dynamics of the aging process and strategies for maximizing life satisfaction during aging

HS 4424 Teaching Methods in Agriculture and Human Sciences: 4 hours.

Prerequisite: CALS major and junior standing. Three hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Planning instruction; selecting teaching techniques; developing teaching plans; teaching agricultural/human sciences topics; using instructional technologies; and evaluating learner progress. Same as AIS 4424

HS 4450 Work Experience in Human Sciences Related Occupations: 3-6 hours.

(3-6) Work experience in two phases of occupational human sciences, development of a program of work, and incorporating the work experience into curricula

HS 4462 Curriculum in Human Sciences: 2 hours.

(Prerequisites: Senior standing and admission to teacher education). Two hours lecture. Basis for curriculum planning; exemplar curriculums; and customizing curriculums

HS 4513 Social-Psychological Aspects of Clothing: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 3573 and three hours Sociology or Psychology and junior standing). Three hours lecture. Exploration of the sociological and psychological aspects of wearing apparel; man's response to and use of clothing as aspect of behavior at different life stages

HS 4533 Merchandise Planning and Buying: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 4583). Three hours lecture. Capstone course in planning, buying and managing inventory in a fashion retail environment

HS 4583 Entrepreneurship for Human Sciences: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Exploration of services/products that have potential for home-based businesses with emphasis on business, marketing, and management skills necessary for operation of these businesses

HS 4593 Creative Design Techniques: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 1533 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Application of techniques- dyeing, knitting, crochet, embroidery, beading, etc.- for creation and embellishment of garments and accessories. Also utilization of multicultural and historic design inspirations

HS 4603 Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 2553 and HS 4513 or equivalent or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Evaluation of global issues facing the textile complex-fiber, textile and apparel industries. Students will learn about international trade and global issues in the textile complex

HS 4683 Current Housing Problems of Families: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing). Three hours lecture. Analysis of current housing problems confronting families, their historical development, government policies and remedial measures

HS 4701 Internship Placement Seminar: 1 hour.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor). One hour lecture. Preparation for an internship in a chosen specialization

HS 4702 Human Sciences Senior Seminar: 2 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing in Human Sciences). Two hours lecture. Examination of current societal issues and trends using an integrative approach. Emphasis on professional development and effectiveness in Human Sciences

HS 4710 Study Tour: 1-3 hours.

Experiential learning through travel in the United States or abroad focusing on specialized areas of study in human sciences

HS 4711 ATM Senior Portfolio: 1 hour.

( Prerequisite: Graduating senior status).Two hours laboratory. Hands-on laboratory to prepare final senior portfolio presentations for faculty review. Apparel, Textiles, and Merchandising concentrations only

HS 4733 Computer-Aided Design for Human Sciences: 3 hours.

Two hours lecture.Two hours laboratory. Applications of computer-based design for interior design, fashion merchandising , child development, human sciences education,consumer economics, foods and nutrition

HS 4740 PreK-K Teacher Candidacy Internship: 12 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of instructor). Individual work experience in an approvedl preschool/PreK-K setting under supervision of Mississippi State University faculty

HS 4750 Internship: 5-8 hours.

(Prerequisite: Minimum of senior standing in the major and consent of instructor). Individual work experience in an approved setting under supervision of Mississippi State University faculty

HS 4760 Child Development Internship: 12 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of instructor). Individual work experience in an approved child studies setting under supervision of Mississippi State University faculty

HS 4763 Apparel, Textiles and Merchandising Internship: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Minimum of senior standing, 2.0 GPA and consent of instructor).Individual work experience in an approved apparel, textiles, or merchandising setting under supervision of Miss.State University faculty. (Course may be taken for credit 2 times )

HS 4770 Child Life Internship: 12 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of instructor). Individual work experience in an approved child life setting under the supervision of Mississippi State University faculty

HS 4780 Youth Development Internship: 12 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of instructor). Individual work experience in an approved youth-serving setting under supervision of Mississippi State University faculty

HS 4790 Family Science Internship: 12 hours.

(Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of instructor). Individual work experience in an approved family services setting under supervision of Mississippi State University faculty

HS 4803 Parenting: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 1813 and junior/senior writing, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Study of the child as a part of the family in a dynamic human ecological system

HS 4813 Adult Development: The Middle Years: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 1813 or consent of instructor).Three hours lecture. Theory and perspectives on adulthood in contemporary society, adjustment to internal and environmental changes, role structures, supportive networks and public policy issues

HS 4823 Development and Administration of Child Service Programs: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 3813 or concurrent enrollment). Three hours lecture. Planning, administering, and evaluating the organizational structure of a variety of child service programs

HS 4831 Child Life Foundations: 1 hour.

(Prerequisites:HS 2813, junior standing and permission of instructor).One hour lecture. Foundations and history of child life practice including impact of illness on child and family, elements of therapeutic play and medical preparation

HS 4832 Child Life Clinical: 2 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 2813, 4833, junior standing and permission of the instructor). Four hours laboratory. This course provides the student with a child life practicum experience in a pediatric health care facility

HS 4833 The Hospitalized Child.: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 3803 and HS 3813 or concurrent enrollment, junior standing or permission of the instructor). Three hours lecture. A pre-practicum development approach to the special needs of the hospitalized infant, child and adolescent

HS 4843 Family Interaction: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites:HS 4853 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Interaction within functional families; focus on the family as a system, on diversity and roles, and on effective interactions

HS 4853 The Family: A Human Ecological Perspective: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 1813 and junior/senior writing, or consent of instructor ). Three hours lecture. The impact of internal and external factors on the development of individual and family relationships throughout the life cycle

HS 4863 Consumer Aspects of Aging: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS3303 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Analysis of the decisions, issues and research related to the consumer aspects of aging from a global and national perspective

HS 4873 Positive Youth Development: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 1813 and junior/senior writing class or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Examines theoretical and empirical foundations of the growing field of Positive Youth Development; examines school and community-based programs that foster PYD

HS 4883 Risk, Resilience and Preventive Interventions: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 1813 and junior/senior writing;or consent of instructor).Three hours lecture. Theory and research relevant to understanding risk and resilience in human development and family studies application of risk/resilience framework to individual and family preventive interventions

HS 4886 Teaching Internship in Human Sciences: 6 hours.

(Prerequisites:Admissions to Teacher Education, minimum grade point average of 2.5 overall and in major, and completion of all professional education courses with a grade of C or better). Supervised observation and directed teaching in respective field of endorsement

HS 4896 Teaching Internship in Human Sciences: 6 hours.

(Prerequisistes:Admission to Teacher Education, minimum grade point average of 2.5 overall and in major, and completion of all professional education courses with a grade of C or better). Supervised observation and directed teaching in respective field of endorsement

HS 4990 Special Topics in Human Sciences: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

HS 6313 Family Resource Management: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior/senior writing or consent of instructor.) Three hours lecture. Decision-making in the family and operation of the household as affected by family values, philosophies, resources, and socio-economic conditions

HS 6323 Consumer Issues and Policy: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 3303 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An assessment of policies and programs relating to information, product safety, and channels of appeal for the individual

HS 6333 Families, Legislation and Public Policy: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior/senior writing or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An examination of the impact of legislation and public policy on the well being of the family with emphasis on policy and family change

HS 6403 Introduction to Gerontology: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 1813 and junior/senior writing, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. An introduction to the dynamics of the aging process and strategies for maximizing life satisfaction during aging

HS 6424 Teaching Methods in Agriculture and Human Sciences: 4 hours.

Prerequisite: CALS major and junior standing. Three hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Planning instruction; selecting teaching techniques; developing teaching plans; teaching agricultural/human sciences topics; using instructional technologies; and evaluating learner progress. Same as AIS 4424

HS 6513 Social-Psychological Aspects of Clothing: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 3573 and three hours Sociology or Psychology and junior standing). Three hours lecture. Exploration of the sociological and psychological aspects of wearing apparel; man's response to and use of clothing as aspect of behavior at different life stages

HS 6593 Creative Design Techniques: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites: HS 1533 or consent of instructor). Two hours lecture. Two hours laboratory. Application of techniques- dyeing, knitting, crochet, embroidery, beading, etc.- for creation and embellishment of garments and accessories. Also utilization of multicultural and historic design inspirations

HS 6683 Current Housing Problems of Families: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: Junior standing). Three hours lecture. Analysis of current housing problems confronting families, their historical development, government policies and remedial measures

HS 6710 Study Tour: 1-3 hours.

Experiential learning through travel in the United States or abroad focusing on specialized areas of study in human sciences

HS 6803 Parenting: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 1813 and junior/senior writing, or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Study of the child as a part of the family in a dynamic human ecological system

HS 6813 Adult Development: The Middle Years: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 1813 or consent of instructor).Three hours lecture. Theory and perspectives on adulthood in contemporary society, adjustment to internal and environmental changes, role structures, supportive networks and public policy issues

HS 6823 Development and Administration of Child Service Programs: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 3813 or concurrent enrollment). Three hours lecture. Planning, administering, and evaluating the organizational structure of a variety of child service programs

HS 6843 Family Interaction: 3 hours.

(Prerequisites:HS 4853 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Interaction within functional families; focus on the family as a system, on diversity and roles, and on effective interactions

HS 6853 The Family: A Human Ecological Perspective: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite: HS 1813 and junior/senior writing, or consent of instructor ). Three hours lecture. The impact of internal and external factors on the development of individual and family relationships throughout the life cycle

HS 6863 Consumer Aspects of Aging: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS3303 or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Analysis of the decisions, issues and research related to the consumer aspects of aging from a global and national perspective

HS 6873 Positive Youth Development: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 1813 and junior/senior writing class or consent of instructor). Three hours lecture. Examines theoretical and empirical foundations of the growing field of Positive Youth Development; examines school and community-based programs that foster PYD

HS 6883 Risk, Resilience and Preventive Interventions: 3 hours.

(Prerequisite:HS 1813 and junior/senior writing;or consent of instructor).Three hours lecture. Theory and research relevant to understanding risk and resilience in human development and family studies application of risk/resilience framework to individual and family preventive interventions

HS 6990 Special Topics in Human Sciences: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

HS 7000 Directed Individual Study in Human Sciences: 1-6 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

HS 8000 Thesis Research/ Thesis in Human Sciences: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged

HS 8113 Trends in Infant and Child Development: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Overview of current research in infant and child development; implications for program development and advocacy

HS 8123 The Effects of Poverty on Children and Families: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Exploration of the impact of poverty on children and families, identification of risk/protective factors, and development of family and child interventions to reduce risk

HS 8313 Contemporary Youth Issues: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Current topics in the areas of youth studies and adolescent development

HS 8413 Issues in Family Studies: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Exploration of current scholarship in relevant topics of interest in the study of families

HS 8423 Development in Intimate Relationships: 3 hours.

A multidisciplinary investigation of how intimate relationships in contemporary U.S. society form, develop, maintain, and dissolve

HS 8813 Seminar in Human Development and Family Studies: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. An introduction to the graduate program, faculty research, and policies and procedures. Skills in writing a literature review, grant writing, and giving professional presentations will be learned

HS 8823 Advanced Theories of Human Development and Family Relations: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Study of theories of human development and family studies across the lifespan

HS 8833 Foundations of Human Development and Family Studies: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. Examination of the philosophical and theoretical foundations of Human Development and Family Studies

HS 8853 Current Issues in Human Development and Family Studies: 3 hours.

Three hours lecture. An in-depth examination of particular HDFS topics of current interest to faculty and students. Critical evaluation of current research

HS 8990 Special Topics in Human Sciences: 1-9 hours.

Credit and title to be arranged. This course is to be used on a limited basis to offer developing subject matter areas not covered in existing courses. (Courses limited to two offerings under one title within two academic years)

HS 9000 Dissertation Research /Dissertation in Human Sciences: 1-13 hours.

Hours and credits to be arranged